Third Party & Independents Archives

Time for an Intervention?

It seems we have got our selves into a mess. Our finances are a mess. We are THE debtor nation, our trade imbalance is $500 billion. Our infrastructure is dated, our oil addiction is growing and we have only politicians not statesmen for leaders. Our political leaders are as divided as we are on each and every issue. Misinformation, half truths and outright lies rule the media. Corporations that call this country home outsource jobs and technology to low wage countries. Our children are not receiving the education they need to compete in the global economy.

It seems we are addicted to anything and everything that is self destructive, so why not some rehab and a 12 step program. Here are some of my ideas for a 12 step program…

It's all the conservatives fault. It's all the liberals fault. It's the fault of the moderates and independents. It's the illegal immigrants fault, no its the fault of the schools, No it's the poor that won't work, no it's not it's the rich who won't hire, no it's not, it's the fault of the computers, can't be, it's the Chinese, nope its the… Get my point?

The fault is owned by all of us individually and collectively. We all danced this past 20 years, we all rode the gravy train and delighted at the tax cuts and the additional benefits. So yes it was all of those I mentioned plus some I didn't mention, yet here we are still pointing fingers.

Step 1: Stop blaming others. Repeat every day “ask not what your country can do for you ask what you can do for your country and the next generation or three ”. Lets face it, we are fighting the battle of tomorrow with the ideologies of the past. Has it worked? Nope. Were you right? Yep. Were you wrong? Yep. But here we are with many more problems that we had.

Step 2: Accept responsibility for your actions. Come on, did we really think that we could go to war, raise entitlements and cut taxes? Did we really believe that we could have stagnant wages and doubling of housing prices? Did we really believe that the “moneychangers” could actually control their appetites for profits? Shame on us.

Step 3: Time out on the ideological wars. Time to make amends. We are all Americans and the team needs us. Time to step up to the plate. Lets fight and bicker on the smaller issues when we are in better shape as a country. I know we are addicted to it, just like we are addicted to the oil, and the money, and the easy credit, and the tax cuts. But it is time to change our ways, help others with the same addictions. Establish a new way of fixing our problems.

Over the past 30 years income inequality has grown to levels not seen since before the great depression. This has been due to a number of factors but if those not in the top 10% of income cannot earn enough to pay taxes America will be a third world nation. Revenues are down, one reason is because we have a jobs crisis in this country. Many jobs have been outsourced to cheap labor countries. Many jobs have been lost to technological improvements. Many jobs have been lost to corporate restructuring . We need to create well paying jobs in the construction and manufacturing sectors.

Step 4: Reinstate a progressive tax structure and cut tax loop holes. Tax loops holes such as credits for corporations outsourcing jobs is one, 15% tax on capital gains for hedge funds is another. It is time to reverse the redistribution of wealth to the top of the money chain. I do not propose an increase to 70% as we have seen in the past but perhaps it is time to temporarily raise the rate to 50%. Tax the corporations that outsource out of country. Raise the ante on unemployment to large corporations that layoff workers. Make it their problem. Why else do we as a country need these mega corporations if they don't create jobs. Spend the money to finance large scale infrastructure projects.. and to educate our workforce. It is an investment in our country.

Since the 1980's the conservative wing of the Republican party has used a strategy called "Starve the Beast" in an effort to cut the size and cost of government. I guess the idea was to keep lowering taxes and allow the beast to gorge on borrowed money. It hasn't worked, in fact just the opposite, government has grown considerably.

Step 5: Abandon the starve the beast strategy. It's time to pay the piper. Before we pass the debt to the next generation. Work to get government to a manageable size by cutting with a laser not an ax.

Revenues are down, one reason is because we have a jobs crisis in this country. Many jobs have been outsourced to cheap labor countries. Many jobs have been lost to technological improvements. Many jobs have been lost to corporate restructuring . We need to create well paying jobs in the construction and manufacturing sectors. We need to educate our children to a level we have not accomplished in the past.

Step 6: Raise our education standards. One side argues vouchers the other side argues more for public schools. Lets do both. Lets pay for it, while we do it,not borrow to do it. Open schools year around. If a student is having trouble in a subject instead of moving them up to the next grade give them specialized instruction in the summer but with different instructors. Then let them continue at the next grade level. Teach things we need to know, like finance, in high school.

Throughout the history of this country we have found ourselves at war. Every time we went to war taxes were raised to fund the war effort. Every time until the turn of this century that is. To fund the war in Iraq and Afghanistan we borrowed and spent as well as lowered taxes. What kind of fiscal responsibility is that.

Step 7: Create a tax or sell off assets with the proceeds used specifically to pay off the war debt. Apply the funds directly to the 1 trillion + we borrowed to fund the wars.

One of the main reasons we are in debt is due to a lack of managing entitlements properly. Social Security and Medicare/Medicaid. Both the employer and the employee contribute evenly to SS at roughly 12% of wages. The same goes for Medicare /Medicaid, only the total is 2.9% of wages. There is a ceiling of just over $100,000 for SS. Monies collected from these wage deductions goes into the general fund. Medicare was expanded during the Bush administration and as part of the expansion the government gave up the ability to negotiate with Pharmaceutical companies on drug prices.

Step 8:, Get entitlements in order. I propose we institute some proper oversight on the money collected for the Social Security program.

1.Get SS out of the general fund. Put it in that lock box. Raise the ceiling to an appropriate level. Make seniors pay into SS out of their SS checks, after all we are the ones that lowered the ceiling and saved the taxes by allowing the SS money to be used in the general fund.

2. Raise medicare rates. They have not been raised in years, have they? The medicaid/medicare reform put into place in 2003 did not include raising the rates to match the additional benefits, how foolish is that? Health care costs have skyrocketed the past 15 years judging by the rates charged in the private sector. Get our best deals on drugs, repeal the provision in the law that does not allow for negotiated drug prices. Fix the problems with M/M and perhaps much of the Affordable Health Care Act will not be needed and the focus for that law can be amended to cutting costs.

The defense budget has skyrocketed the past decade. We are the policemen to the world at no charge. Why do we need to protect Europe from Russia? Why do we need to be in Iraq. Do we have to send forces to Libya . Where does it end?

Step 9: Cut the military budget in half. Not all at once of course but in stages. Job killer? The defense contractors are outsourcing anyway. Bring the troops home or get paid to protect the corporate interests that benefit on the taxpayers dime.

The discretionary portion of the federal budget has also skyrocketed in the past decade. Many programs are overlapping and redundant. All departments need to tighten the belt until the deficit is zeroed out and the debt is substantially reduced.

Step 10: Reduce the department budgets to the 2008 level unless it affects job creation or education.

Well that raises revenue and cuts costs. Now lets pay off some more of that debt and stash some entitlements cash so our children and grandchildren don't have to support us.

Step 11: Continue to bring back manufacturing. Why? So we as a country can maintain our ability to innovate. Necessity is the mother of innovation and without the challenge of finding new ways we will fall behind the rest of the world. Why? So those of us that do not go on to higher education can make an honest living. Why? So when globalization falls apart we can supply ourselves. Why? Because we are self reliant, aren't we?

The next 2 steps are left intentionally blank. You tell me what they should be.

Posted by j2t2 at February 27, 2011 12:22 PM
Comments
Comment #319308

I admire the sentiments. I have a few comments, which I don’t think contradict as much as reinforce.


I do worry about the beast growing if it is fed. Remember the collapses we faced in the 1970s, when the beast was better fed. We did okay with taxes and revenues in 1999. But I fear that the discipline was breaking down even then.

Re schools - there is no correlation between money spent and results. We have increased spending per pupil in real terms for the past thirty years. We need a little more competition. Vouchers would help provide this at no additional cost. So I don’t think you have to exempt education spending.

re defense - I think we should indeed get out of some places and get others to help pay for their own defense. I advocated using Iraqi oil revenues to defray some of our expenses there. (they called it a war for oil; perhaps unfortunately, it wasn’t) The Japanese pay a good part of the expenses of our forces there. Not a bad idea.

Re SS - there is not now nor has there ever been anything like a lock box possibility. It is like writing checks to yourself and then claiming that you have saved money. The Federal government controls money. They have to make all payments with dollars taken from the current generations.

Re income taxes - we should probably have a rate for super earners. I would like to get at all those rock stars, financial superstars & athletes. I am just not sure how we can get that money w/o burning everyone else. The rich can afford lawyers to avoid getting hit.

Posted by: C&J at February 27, 2011 2:05 PM
Comment #319313

Some excellent points…

I have many thoughts, but in the interest of brevity I’ll keep it to one point. I agree that we need to do something to create jobs here. It’s easy to just point the finger at someone else, like all politicians do, but far too much of our “policy” only addresses the symptoms and not the cause. At some point we have to recognize that if we don’t put politics aside and come up with a solution to address what’s creating the problem in the first place, we’re never going to solve it.

Let’s get back to basics:

Companies outsource because it’s cheaper and they need to manage their cost base to stay competitive. One reason is costs more to do business in the States is the unfortunate by-product of the high standard of living we have achieved. If we’re willing to sacrifice our standard of living, we could instantly make it cheaper to manufacture product here, but I’m pretty sure none of us are willing to do that.

One of the other reasons companies outsource is due to the fact that we now have the highest corporate income tax rates in the world (we were second until Japan lowered their rates recently). Do we not see the correlation here? I’m not one of those that thinks the solution to everything is to lower taxes. That being said, let’s remember who the money belongs to in the first place. Despite the left’s talking points, the rich already pay their fair share, as do companies. You can’t expect companies to create jobs here while at the same time, penalize them for doing so with draconian tax rates.

So here’s my solution:

In his State of The Union address, the President mentioned lowering corporate income taxes for the reasons mentioned above. Now, don’t get me wrong, I don’t think he means it and probably doesn’t intend to actually do anything about it, but why not use it as an opportunity. The President did open the door after all.

Let’s just cut the corporate rate in half for companies that keep all their operations here. Companies can still outsource if they choose, but they pay the high rate. If they keep all of their jobs in the States, they get the low rate. This would provide a huge incentive for companies to keep jobs here, while also helping them manage their costs so they can still be competitive.

Before the left screams, it’s not corporate welfare. Welfare is taking money from one person and giving it to another. Letting someone keep more of their own money is not. Nobody, including and especially the Government, gets to decide who gets to keep their own property. That’s one of the most basic tenets of our Constitution.

Everybody wins here. Companies can significantly reduce their costs. This makes them more competitive (which saves consumers money), it makes them more profitable (which makes shareholders money), and it keeps or creates more jobs here, which puts more people to work. All of these also have the nice little side benefit of stimulating our economy. I’m pretty sure we can all at least get together on that one.

Posted by: Kevin Nye at February 27, 2011 4:30 PM
Comment #319315

Kevin,
The nature of our system depends upon openness to new companies, and the possibility for small organizations to grow into large ones.

Companies which outsource or relocate in order to avoid taxation are free riders, parasites upon the system. Their actions undermine Americans in order to prey upon other peoples who lack the protection of unions, government oversight, and environmental regulations. Those parasitic companies should be taxed prohibitively. In addition, any corporation which has a board and a certain percentage of upper management who are American citizens should be considered ‘American’ companies.

Any corporations, such as Halliburton, which relocate to Abu Dhabi or wherever to avoid corporate taxes should be barred from government contracts. Period.

New companies will fill the niche left by any that choose to depart, and medium-sized companies will become larger. Greed can be counted upon to motivate competitors to replace the parasites. There is always someone willing to shave a percent of profit in order to gain market share.

J2t2,
Agreed that DoD should be drastically cut. Here is my version of a solution.

1. Re-institute Clinton era rates of taxation. Use the proceeds to fund Universal Health Care.

2. Do what Ronald Reagan did, and raise Social Security payroll tax, this time by 1%. Lower the retirement age to 62.

3. Cut DoD spending by just 1%, and end the Wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Spend the savings on Universal Education through college level for all who qualify.

4. Eliminate the Marine Corps. Use the additional savings to fund green research, providing grants to public institutions of education.

Our situation is similar to the one in 1993. We had just come out of a recession, faced a spiraling debt, and had seen part of the financial sector (Savings and Loans) collapse due to deregulation. At that time the Democratic Congress raised taxes in the Omnibus Act of 1993. Conservatives warned of disaster, just the way they are doing today. Instead, the economy boomed.

Lowering the retirement age would create job openings for American citizens.

There is no better investment in American society than education.

Creating a healthy, growing economy will eventually resolve deficits. Remember, the conservatives warned of dire consequences when taxes were raised in the 90’s. By the end of a decade, we experienced phenomenal growth, and projected a $10 trillion deficit.

Don’t buy into the conservative negativity of cutting and doing less for ourselves through the tool of government. It’s a fundamentally greedy, negative, destructive philosophy.

Posted by: phx8 at February 27, 2011 4:59 PM
Comment #319316

Correction: by 2000, we projected a $10 trillion surplus. The future looked so good, Congress sent rebate checks.

It’s the strangest thing. We know what worked in the past, and we can see what is working for other wealthy countries, yet we seemed locked into an incredibly destructive attitute towards our government, “We the People.”

Posted by: phx8 at February 27, 2011 5:14 PM
Comment #319317

Eliminate the Marine Corps? Are you nuts? :)

Take the cap of the social security tax. If there is to be a cut-off point, it should be for the lowest earners, not the highest earners. Then do a financial analysis at retirement age. If you have over so much, you don’t collect. You don’t need it.

Just my thought.

Posted by: womanmarine at February 27, 2011 5:24 PM
Comment #319318

While the U.S. corporate tax rate may be (nominally) high, what are these corporations actually paying, as a percentage of their income, in taxes?

Proclaiming the rates to be high is meaningless if the corporations are actually paying a small share.

Posted by: steve miller at February 27, 2011 5:25 PM
Comment #319319

Phx8,

I appreciate your comments, but I can’t say that I agree. You seem to share the same “class warfare” philosphy as those that want to vilify business, yet at the same time, want to tax them into oblivion then criticize them for taking their business elsewhere.

I don’t want companies to outsource jobs or manufacturing. I want them to keep it here as much as possible because that creates jobs and helps our economy. But we can’t ignore the fact that companies are businesses and their single mission is to generate profits. The more expensive it is to do business, the less of a profit they make. The lower their profits, the fewer jobs they will be able to create and the more they will be forced to find other ways to reduce their costs (i.e., outsourcing). It’s survival, not being free-riders or parasites.

If we want to create jobs and boost our economy, it has to be beneficial for companies to do business here. If we try and force them to, companies have fewer options and their products and/or services become more expensive. This hurts consumers and our economy by making it more expensive for everyday Americans to purchase those goods and services.

The sooner people recognize that companies are not the enemy, the sooner we’ll be in a position to actually start growing our economy and creating jobs.

Posted by: Kevin Nye at February 27, 2011 5:25 PM
Comment #319320

j2t2 said,

“The fault is owned by all of us individually and collectively. We all danced this past 20 years, we all rode the gravy train and delighted at the tax cuts and the additional benefits. So yes it was all of those I mentioned plus some I didn’t mention, yet here we are still pointing fingers.”

The fault does not go back 20 years; it goes back 70 years to the birth of socialism in the democratic party. You talk as if you are turning over a new leaf and calling for, “can’t we all just get along”, and yet you place our problems back to the democrats loss of the Congress, for the first time in 40 years. Your pleas to get along and work together ring hollow.

Posted by: 1776 at February 27, 2011 6:41 PM
Comment #319321

Womanmarine,
Well, you’re right, we should roll the Army into the Marines. Of course, that would come from an Air Force guy…

Removing the paroll cap on SS would be another effective way of improving the system.

Kevin,
Usually, invoking the phrase “class warfare” is intended to end the argument, as if conjuring visions of Marxism means an automatic victory for the one who brings it up. However, classes do exist- yes, it’s true, I must insist, even here in the US- and there is a constant struggle, or conflict, although the word ‘warfare’ is probably too strong. There is no point in pretending classes do not exist; the question is, how to make sure everyone gets along well enough that opportunities are available for all, and the poor do not come after the rich with pitchforks.

No on is suggesting corporations should be “taxed into oblivion.” A healthy economy with a healthy, educated and productive populace, a peaceful environment, a clean environment, and a solid infrastructure gives a corporation an excellent chance to flourish and be profitable. Creating a healthy economy with all of those attributes requires taxation.

Posted by: phx8 at February 27, 2011 7:09 PM
Comment #319322

1776,
You write:
“… it goes back 70 years to the birth of socialism in the democratic party.”

There are so many things wrong in that sentence, I don’t even know where to start. Please clarify.

Posted by: phx8 at February 27, 2011 7:28 PM
Comment #319323

17, There was no fault in the 20 year figure, read it again. I simply said we have all danced the past 20 years. Now it is time to pay the fiddler.


Posted by: j2t2 at February 27, 2011 8:25 PM
Comment #319324


phx8,

I have read several of you comments and think it would be waste of time trying to eplain to you.

j2t2, so we have been dancing ever since the democrats were sent home in the 90’s? Again, you call for a blanket acceptance of the responsibility by both parties and yet continue the liberal plan of blaming conservatives?


Posted by: 1776 at February 27, 2011 8:42 PM
Comment #319325

“Re schools - there is no correlation between money spent and results. We have increased spending per pupil in real terms for the past thirty years. We need a little more competition. Vouchers would help provide this at no additional cost. So I don’t think you have to exempt education spending.”

C&J,I have a few comments but I guess the most important is who needs to compete to solve the problem? If you are suggesting that schools need to compete then we are giving up on half of the kids, right? Or do we then send them all to the one school in the area better then the rest, which of course then becomes overburdened and fails to be the best.

I think we need to get beyond competition as the solution to the problem, it isn’t football after all. Now if Green Bay won the super bowl every year then perhaps competition would be the answer.

Posted by: j2t2 at February 27, 2011 8:47 PM
Comment #319326

I haven’t danced like that, j2t2! $170,000 a year salary, health care, retirement benefits? That’s not me dancing, j2t2!

Posted by: Weary Willie at February 27, 2011 8:58 PM
Comment #319328

The point I was making had nothing to do with either the dems or the repubs 17. I am saying times were good, relatively speaking, in the nineties and up to 2007. We were all dancing to the music. Unfortunately we ran up a tab. The musicians need to get paid. It is time to pay the tab. Because we were all at the dance hall we need to kick in to pay the tab. It has nothing to do with who was the majority in the house. I could just as well have said 25 years or 15 years.

Posted by: j2t2 at February 27, 2011 9:04 PM
Comment #319329

j2t2, why don’t minorities in DC have the same competitive education opportunities that most politicians and their staff have? I don’t see Obama sending his girls to a broken public educational system.

I don’t guess you got the DC public school memo; Obama did…

Posted by: 1776 at February 27, 2011 9:09 PM
Comment #319330

Or you could have said 70 years. But, I will accept your statement that the Bush years were good years. I don’t believe I have ever heard a liberal say that before; it must be a first on WB.

Posted by: 1776 at February 27, 2011 9:14 PM
Comment #319336
While the U.S. corporate tax rate may be (nominally) high, what are these corporations actually paying, as a percentage of their income, in taxes?

Proclaiming the rates to be high is meaningless if the corporations are actually paying a small share.


Posted by: steve miller at February 27, 2011 05:25 PM


steve miller, Corporations are not paying one thin dime in taxes. The customers of those corporations are paying the taxes via. increased cost at the point of sale. Corporate taxes in any form are actually an increase in the price of the product to the consumer.

Posted by: Weary Willie at February 27, 2011 11:42 PM
Comment #319337

Phx8:

Usually, invoking the phrase ‘class warfare’ is intended to end the argument, as if conjuring visions of Marxism means an automatic victory for the one who brings it up.
Companies which outsource or relocate in order to avoid taxation are free riders, parasites upon the system.

My reference to class warfare was not intended to end the argument. It was simply a reference to the fact that many choose to spend time blaming the “evil corporations” (which seems to be the substance of your argument) instead of figuring out how we can all work together to come up with viable solutions. In order for it to work, it has to be good for both parties involved.

Of course there are classes. But instead of trying to use that to our political advantage, perhaps we should all recognize that business needs workers just as much as workers need business. See my “companies are not the enemy” comment…

Weary Willie:

The customers of those corporations are paying the taxes via increased cost at the point of sale.

Excellent point. Many seem to think that business has an endless stream of revenue. They don’t seem to realize that ultimately, it’s the consumer that pays for any increases in their cost basis. That is, until consumers can no longer afford to. Unfortunately, that story usually ends in bankruptcy and unemployed workers.

Posted by: Kevin Nye at February 28, 2011 12:14 AM
Comment #319339

You guys are correct about the consumer paying the taxes, but the left does not care who pays, as long as the tax dollars keep flowing. Has anyone ever heard fuel excise tax? It is what consumers pay, when the price of fuel goes up.

Posted by: 1776 at February 28, 2011 12:21 AM
Comment #319340

“Corporations are not paying one thin dime in taxes. The customers of those corporations are paying the taxes via. increased cost at the point of sale.”

Using that logic it seems we have no income tax only a consumption tax, right? If a corporation pays my salary which pays what I use to think was an income tax, then it is not really me or you paying the tax it is the consumer. So those of us that buy anything from China are really paying the Chinese income tax for them as well right? But then if a corporation is not paying any taxes after write offs and loop holes no costs are passed on to the consumer so the consumer is not paying any taxes. so if the consumer is not paying taxes and we are not and the corporations are not are the Chinese paying our taxes?

Posted by: j2t2 at February 28, 2011 12:37 AM
Comment #319370

Wrong.

Posted by: Weary Willie at February 28, 2011 6:19 PM
Comment #319371

J2T2,
Good article and suggestions.

All,
Excellent points; however, IMHO we are missing two major points.

1) Energy; Why it would be nice to believe our current energy supplies would last the next 40 years, the facts state the exact opposite is true. So without America making a major step toward energy independence, nothing else matters.

2) Resources; From oil to trees every ounce of natural resources in the world is getting bought up. And though we can’t do nothing to stop the market from speculating on the future. America can take a bold step in bring biomass material on line. For even if America becomes the Industrial Might of the 21st Century, unless we change the resources we use to make buildings, cars, and products. We will run into the same problem down the rode.

Given that we can build a future where corporations and governments only have to worry about 500,000 Economically Viable and Financially Independent Consumers at a $1.00 profit each. Or we can build a future where corporations and governments know they can serve 10 billion Economically Viable and Financially Independent Consumers at $0.10 cents profit. Since anyway we slice it, we are going to have to deal with a population in excess of 10 billion humans somewhere down the road.

Posted by: Henry Schlatman at February 28, 2011 6:21 PM
Comment #319374

You’re right on both counts, Henry Schlatman!

Your points are right on the money. Your given is where we need an intervention!

Corporations should service state and local economies and be considered a tool used by those governments. The thought a corporation is a person in it’s own right is absurd.

Share Holders and board members of corporations have the right to vote as individuals. Board members and share holders should not be allowed to hide behind a corporation in the political arena. A Corporate charter should be defined in every detail and approved by the governing body it will represent. Corporations will abide by the charter granted them or face liquidation. Corporations cannot vote but they also should not be able to speak or influence political decisions. Corporations are tools, not citizens.


Posted by: Weary Willie at February 28, 2011 10:28 PM
Comment #319376

Step 7: Create a tax or sell off assets with the proceeds used specifically to pay off the war debt.

Why not repeal the law that forces our Country, the worlds largest supplier of Helium, to sell off our remaining helium by 2015?
Because we have flooded the market with our stored helium it is at bargain basement prices. Raise the price. Pay off the debt.


http://www.popsci.com/science/article/2010-08/future-these-will-cost-100-each

Posted by: j2t2 at February 28, 2011 10:50 PM
Comment #319382
By 1995, a billion cubic meters of the gas had been collected and the reserve was US$1.4 billion in debt, prompting the Congress of the United States in 1996 to phase out the reserve.[4][28] The resulting “Helium Privatization Act of 1996”[29] (Public Law 104–273) directed the United States Department of the Interior to start emptying the reserve by 2005.[30]

What’s your point, j2t2? Is it deflection? Or, are you trying to point out the excess of assets being unused in our federal government’s inventory?

If you’re in favor of selling these assets to pay off our debt, I’m on board. I see government owned property unused every day of my life. I sold vegatables to the people who worked in the building next door to my home. The building next door to my home is now an empty government building. And it has been an empty government building for the last 20+ years!

It could house a flea market, a school, a restuarant, and a lawyer/jester. But it sits empty. A monument to government’s arrogance and jaba the hut mentality.

Posted by: Weary Willie at March 1, 2011 12:51 AM
Comment #319388

Deflection? seriously Weary? The reserve is to be completely sold out by 2015. Extend the time frame, raise the price, pay the debt. No conspiracy, just 1 of hopefully a thousand things we can do to get the Country moving forward.

Posted by: j2t2 at March 1, 2011 7:13 AM
Comment #319392

Weary Willie,
Corporations can be viewed as a person; however, we must view them as being the best citizen that money can buy. Otherwise, are we not looking at them as the best criminal money can buy?

For just as we demand parents and politicians are held to a higher standard so must we moving forward view corporations as those willing to help America achieve our goals and those who oppose and stand as enemies of our goals IMHO. And since the Common Business method of the 20th Century was and still remains how to screw the Consumer, I do believe we have a long way to go in order to get Big Business back on track.

For example; we want every American to have health care insurance, yet, Governor Walker and others want to dismantle the unions so their pay becomes more in line with the lower pay of the private sector. Thus, instead of increasing all citizens pay enough to afford healthcare insurance on their own. They are increasing the burden of the State and Federal Goveernment as well as the Taxpayers by increasing the number of people who won’t have healthcare insurance. And they do it for what reasons?

Posted by: Henry Schlatman at March 1, 2011 9:36 AM
Comment #319435

“why don’t minorities in DC have the same competitive education opportunities that most politicians and their staff have?”

Finances Weary. Politicians that have the money are free to do as they choose with their child’s education. As are many business executives. As are many wall street bankers. What is wrong with that, Weary are you suggesting an equal outcome for politicians and minorities only or politicians and everyone else?

“I don’t see Obama sending his girls to a broken public educational system.”

Yet they are minorities, right?

SO what do you prose Weary to fix the “broken” public school system?

Posted by: j2t2 at March 1, 2011 9:19 PM
Comment #319436

Oops I meant,

So what do you propose, Weary, to fix the “broken” public school system?

Posted by: j2t2 at March 1, 2011 9:59 PM
Comment #319483


Despite repeated attempts by family members and other interested parties to buy my mothers home, confiscated for Medicare and medicaid debt, it sat empty and subjected to rot and mildew for 6 years until it was sold by the village for back taxes that the government did not pay. By then the house had deteriorated to the point that it had to be torn down and now there is a vacant lot where it stood.

Posted by: jlw at March 2, 2011 9:12 PM
Comment #319484


In order to repair a broken public school system, we must first determine what broke it. Perhaps we don’t want to know.

Posted by: jlw at March 2, 2011 9:30 PM
Post a comment