Third Party & Independents Archives

Congress: The Roman Orgy of perks and benefits

Out of the 435 members in the current House of Representatives only 174 have not missed a single vote, and some have missed between 40 and 50 percent of the votes.

The House took 103 roll call votes on the “prevent government shutdown” fears. The resolution passed at 4:40 a.m. Saturday after five days of votes on amendments, including roll call votes on 23 amendments Thursday, 35 on Friday and 21 before the vote Saturday. The roll calls show that 174 House members have not missed a single vote so far during the 112th Congress. Of the remaining 261 House members, 158 have missed at least 37% of the votes they were elected to act upon.

Freshman Democrats Betty McCollum of Minnesota and Ruben Hinojosa of Texas, and Freshman Republican Ben Quayle of Arizona missed 56 votes each. Freshman Democrats Jane Harman of California and Gary Peters of Michigan, and Republican Ron Paul of Texas each missed 43 votes.

I think we’re allowed to give Arizona Representative Gabrielle Giffords a pass for having not voted since she was shot in the head during an assassination attempt in Tucson in January. And Ron Paul was attending the funeral of the husband of his friend and district director, so I’m not inclined to fault him. There’s no record of where Harman, Hinojosa, McCollum or Quayle were. But it sure is interesting that these four “fireball” newcomers – especially the Tea Partiers – have so quickly boarded the Shirker Express in Washington.

Add the fact that Congress’ pay and benefits are *exempt from government shutdown” … i.e., they continue collecting their $174,000 paycheck and choke-a-horse perks package no matter what happens after the government’s funding runs out next Friday.

Also add that Congress is exempt from whatever health care requirements or Medicare/Medicaid cuts they impose on taxpayers because they gave themselves the choice to “opt in” on public health care or take the taxpayer-funded premium plan offered to all Congressional officials.

Also add that Congress is exempt from whatever impact the stock market has on 401k/retirement/savings accounts because they gave themselves the choice to “opt in” on Social Security and commercial 401k programs or take the more lucrative taxpayer-funded premium plan offered to all Congressional officials.

Also add that Congress has exempted itself from TSA travel rules, restrictions, security scans and pat-downs, as long as they’re traveling with a taxpayer-funded personal security detail.

Also add that members of Congress automatically draw a percentage of their salary for life after leaving office. That pension ranges from a minimum of 28% up to 80%, depending on their length of time in office. (Note: 28% of $174,000 is $48,720.)

Also add that every member of Congress is paid per diem, free travel, free postage, free health club/spa memberships, free retirement (i.e., they don’t pay in), and all expenses such as cell phones, meals, bottled water, clothing allowances – even shoe polishing – are all paid by you and I.

And get this: Congress even exempted itself from THE CIVIL RIGHTS ACT!

So Congress sits up on their golden thrones, deciding how much bread they’re going to take off your table, and what bargain rights someone who works 80-hours a week will be allowed to have, and how much Americans must sacrifice for the sake of improving the economy — while they relish in a veritable Roman orgy of money, perks and benefits.

It’s getting closer and closer to torches and pitchforks in the street outside the Capitol Building.

But there *is* good news: Ace Hardware is having a “20% Off” sale all this week.

Posted by Gary St. Lawrence at February 25, 2011 3:24 PM
Comments
Comment #319237

20% off wow. What was the rest of that about? Oh yeah ;)

Ya know seeings it is the taxpayers providing that salary and all those benefits you would think they would at the least enact laws that favored the tax payers not the special interest… oh wait that is where the real money is at isn’t it?

Posted by: j2t2 at February 25, 2011 3:55 PM
Comment #319242

Congress should indeed be subject to all the rules that it imposes on the rest of it.

I don’t want to defend politicians, but their salaries and pension plan are similar to other Federal employees and less than that enjoyed by many state and local employees in similar situations. They do get too many perks, however.

re salaries in general - $174K sounds like a lot of money, but given the level of responsibility they have - at least in theory - it is not far out of line. Given the current state of politics, they might not have that much job security.

Posted by: C&J at February 25, 2011 6:10 PM
Comment #319243

Gary

BTW - I may call you “liberal” and give you a hard time, but congratulations on writing so thoroughly and regularly.

Posted by: C&J at February 25, 2011 6:13 PM
Comment #319247

I think there’s a basic principle, a basic attitude we should apply here, that in the waning age of Reagan that we’ve failed to apply: these people are our delegates, our equals, that the government isn’t something far off, something imposed from outside on us.

I think it’s critical for the sake of accountability, for the sake of not giving ourselves the out of resigning ourselves to corruption, to view these people as reachable and touchable by concerted public effort to change things in Washington.

I also think it’s critical that we approach the politics of things with the notion that our own interests are paramount, and that we should be wary about anybody who tells us that we can improve our own interests by sacrificing them to those of somebody richer and more powerful. That’s a con game there, one that’s been used again and again to inflict harm on the average person’s wealth, health, and peace of mind.

Posted by: Stephen Daugherty at February 25, 2011 8:01 PM
Comment #319254

Gary St. Lawrence, There is alot of information in your post! Thank you! I’ve sent this link to my contacts in New Orleans, Michigan, Texas, and Indiana. I wish it had supporting links!

About those torches and pitchforks, though. A little old-fashoned don’t you think? I have a $300 Smith and Wesson 9mm I’m reasonably comfortable with. The AR15 and the Glock 9mm also suit the purpose.

Words though, words are our best weapon. There is no reason we on WatchBlog cannot write our own laws addressing these issues you’ve written about. There is no reason we can’t write a law to be addressed on the floor of the HOR (Hey! That rhymes!) to be given an up or down vote. A Citizen’s assembly has already decended on the Capatal when the tea-party gathered. They made the mistake of leaving at the end of the day. Armed with a law that the people expect to be given an up or down vote, and an assembly of people to surround and stifle Capitol Hill until that vote is made, will push our objective to the front and put our representative on the record.

We will have to learn the language of writing a bill. I’m willing to do this. I’m sure Congress doesn’t want to learn the language of torches, pitchforks, ect. so.. I’d say our chances of success are pretty good!

How Laws Are Made

The Constitution guarantees a constituent’s right to submit ideas for legislation to his or her Representative in Congress.
Posted by: Weary Willie at February 25, 2011 9:13 PM
Comment #319255
I also think it’s critical that we approach the politics of things with the notion that our own interests are paramount,

OMG! Is Stephen Daugherty addressing the individual?

and that we should be wary about anybody who tells us that we can improve our own interests by sacrificing them to those of somebody richer and more powerful.

Does that include the Democratic Party, Stephen Daugherty?

I think Stephen Daugherty just opened a can of whoopass on himself.

Posted by: Weary Willie at February 25, 2011 9:28 PM
Comment #319257

C&J I know you may not appreciate this but I actually agree with you, almost.

Exempting themselves from about any law as well as a government shutdown is way out of line. Not paying into SS is unacceptable as well. What do they think they are CEO’s?

The $174k per year and having to live in DC most of the year as well as maintaining a home state residence, is a bargain for the taxpayer. They are well underpaid for the work they do. In the private sector upper level management gets much much more on average than that. They should be entitled to a raise. As they all come in from out of town per diem and associated travel benefits seems appropriate. Any business traveler at that level gets the same.

The golden parachute they have managed for themselves is a bit extravagant but not when compared to the same level in the private sector.

Posted by: j2t2 at February 25, 2011 9:54 PM
Comment #319258

28% to 80% retirement with no monitary investment is not comparable to the private sector.

We need to know more about this retirement package our congressman gets.

Posted by: Weary Willie at February 25, 2011 10:05 PM
Comment #319259

How many years must my congressman be employed to receive 80% of his pay for the rest of his life? Same question with 28%?

Where did this 28% to 80% figure come from, Gary St. Lawrence? Do you have a link to that?


Posted by: Weary Willie at February 25, 2011 10:11 PM
Comment #319261

Does the Term limit argument render the retirement benefit package moot?

If my congressman can get this retirement benefit then why can’t my neighbor’s son/Army Vet get it as well?

There’s a lot of reasons this issue should be dealt with.

Posted by: Weary Willie at February 25, 2011 10:20 PM
Comment #319266

Weary, GE gave Walsh a helicopter and millions as well as company perks for life when he retired, if it’s good for Executives it should be good for Congress.

$125k per year retirement for 30 years is $3.5million. Walsh made out much better.

“If my congressman can get this retirement benefit then why can’t my neighbor’s son/Army Vet get it as well?”

Two reasons Weary.
1. He is not upper level management.
2. He is not in a union with collective bargaining rights. Of course those joining the military know that going in.

Posted by: j2t2 at February 25, 2011 11:38 PM
Comment #319268

OK j2t2, how can he possibly get to the upper level without a leg or a senator?

Number 2 is a sick attempt at a cheap shot.

Posted by: Weary Willie at February 26, 2011 12:19 AM
Comment #319270

j2t2, there shouldn’t be just one best and one brightest.

There should be the best and the brightest in every local community. Each block, each town, would have their own best and brightest.

This idea of the federal government, or upper level management, or yer onion rep, being our best and our brightest is pure folly.

Posted by: Weary Willie at February 26, 2011 12:40 AM
Comment #319272

In support of my post, here is the source of the Congressional pension information (the 28-80% information):

http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&cd=5&ved=0CD4QFjAE&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.senate.gov%2Freference%2Fresources%2Fpdf%2FRL30631.pdf&rct=j&q=COngressional%20pension&ei=S5NoTcH6H4_AsAOf1PSCDA&usg=AFQjCNGin2GjcC7VkrnPHR7T_oHfbX35-A&sig2=Cyhg6CzV6Ye7-bblgG9e5Q&cad=rja

“Under both CSRS and FERS, Members of Congress are eligible for a pension at age 62 if they have completed at least five years of service. Members are eligible for a pension at age 50 if they have completed 20 years of service, or at any age after completing 25 years of service. The amount of the pension depends on years of service and the average of the highest three years of salary. By law, the starting amount of a Member’s retirement annuity may not exceed 80% of his or her final salary.

As of October 1, 2006, 413 retired Members of Congress were receiving federal pensions based fully or in part on their congressional service. Of this number, 290 had retired under CSRS and were receiving an average annual pension of $60,972. A total of 123 Members had retired with service under both CSRS and FERS or with service under FERS only. Their average annual pension was $35,952 in 2006.

Retirement with an immediate, full pension is available to members age 60 or older with 10 years of service in Congress, or age 62 with five years of civilian federal service, including service in Congress.”


And remember, even though Congress is paid $174,000 per year, all taxes, deductions and plan contributions are only calculated on the first $97,500. The rest is untouched “net.”

Also remember that while $174,000 might not be a massive salary given Washington DC costs of living, but all Congress’ major living expenses - other than rent/mortgage - are paid by their expense accounts and as perks.

How well would someone on $50,000 a year do if they didn’t have to pay for food, gas, clothing, travel or amenities?

And serving in Congress isn’t SUPPOSED to be commensurate with a corporate executive. They’re PUBLIC SERVANTS, not celebrities. They are supposed to be there out of a desire to serve and SACRIFICE.

Posted by: Gary St. Lawrence at February 26, 2011 12:57 AM
Comment #319280

“OK j2t2, how can he possibly get to the upper level without a leg or a senator?”

FDR served as president while in a wheel chair. I realize not all people can or will be able to do that. It is a bad position to be in but where in the constitution….. Yep I know, another cheap shot but my point is valid. Keep cutting taxes while borrowing money. Keep hiding behind the constitution while supporting the winner take all society that is conservatism and poof this is what you get, Sorry.
Just because this person doesn’t get the same benefits as the upper level management of this country is proof that he did not work hard enough, study hard enough to become an upper level manager. Sorry that this is harsh but do you want it any other way?

“Number 2 is a sick attempt at a cheap shot.”

Just the facts Weary. It is reality slapping you in the face. The wages of working Americans have been going down the past 30 years coincidentally so has the percentage of unionized workers. Remember Weary he chose to be in the military accepting the pay and benefit level of the military. It is wrong to not take care of him and all veterans that served our country so well, but tax cuts were more important. That doesn’t make the salary and perks of the Congress any less valid.

“j2t2, there shouldn’t be just one best and one brightest.”

Very true Weary.

“There should be the best and the brightest in every local community. Each block, each town, would have their own best and brightest.”

Why would you think that this is not the way it is now? Doesn’t your local business and community leaders reflect the B&B of your community? Do these people stay the same or as time goes on do they rise through the ranks to regional, state, country level if they want to do so. I am not sure what this has to do with Congressional pay levels so explain your point please.

“This idea of the federal government, or upper level management, or yer onion rep, being our best and our brightest is pure folly.”

Why is that Weary? Don’t the best and brightest go where the money is under our economic system? If you think we the people should not pay equal to private industry for the B&B, then what do you think we will get? Me and You working for minimum wage running the country. So be careful what you wish for.

Posted by: j2t2 at February 26, 2011 12:25 PM
Comment #319281

“And serving in Congress isn’t SUPPOSED to be commensurate with a corporate executive.”

According to who? Do you realize lobbyist make more than our representatives. The real issue should be good wages and benefits for all those willing to work for them. Ask yourself this, Have I been duped into believing I should tear down those in the public sector for making decent wages because corporate America has beat down the wages in the private sector? Perhaps you will see the fallacy in this thinking and realize the battle is to increase wages in the private sector for middle class working Americans.

” They’re PUBLIC SERVANTS, not celebrities. They are supposed to be there out of a desire to serve and SACRIFICE.”

Good one Gary. Did you think that means financial sacrifice or just sacrifices of the soul, of honor, of integrity. Lets face it, that didn’t work out so well back in the day. That is why the retirement packages of today are in place. Do you really want to see a former Senator homeless and eating out of a dumpster should his fortunes dwindle after serving in the Congress?

I wonder if Delay will get his pension while in jail?

Guys look, Are you perhaps looking at this issue through an Ayn Rand filter? If you support the CEO pay as their right then you have to support the pay of Congress as their right. Other wise we attract less than qualified candidates.

Posted by: j2t2 at February 26, 2011 12:52 PM
Comment #319282

j2t2

Re wages - I think we have a structural problem with the supposed data.

The median income has risen in the last 30 years. We are not talking about average As you know, the median is not affected by changes only in very high or very low incomes, so it is a better measure of general welfare.

On the other hand, we hear that wages for “working people” have stagnated. This also seems to be true, but it stems from the changing position of lower skilled people in the economy.

Back in 1960 - when we evidently take most of our impressions of “workers”, an ordinary working man might work in industry. He could have a HS or less education and still do all right. But the economy has changed. The person at an equivalent level of society is no longer like this guy.

My father was a HS drop out. His kids are college graduates. American society has moved farther up scale. When we go back to the factories, we no longer find many people like my father. When we do, they are at a much lower level. In other words, the comparison of the average worker of 1960 is not valid with the same sort of work in 2011.

Let me make a rough analogy. Consider kids in 8th grade. We look at them at this point in their lives and assess their abilities. We find that those reading at the 8th grade level are doing well. Visit these same kids four years later. We will probably find that those still reading at the 8th grade level are not doing as well. Does this mean the group has made no progress?

I wrote a post on the other blog re a visit to a paper mill. There used to be thousands of people working in these places, most of them semi-skilled. Today only a few guys work there. They are skilled and working with sophisticated technology.

Whether we like it or not, the day of the “ordinary worker” that we recognized and loves is gone. It will never return.

Posted by: C&J at February 26, 2011 12:54 PM
Comment #319286


For many of our politicians the salary and perks are chicken feed.

I will work for the people for less and I am fully capable of voting yes or no on a bill I have not read and would not understand if I did. Ned the greeter and Susan the cashier could do equally as well.

Rhetorical skills are a politicians claim to fame. The best and the brightest at bombast.

It is obvious that CEOs and other corporate executives should make more than elected government officials because corporations are far more important to the people than their government is. It is equally true that Wall Street and the corporations are far more important to politicians that the people are. All the politicians have to do is count their payola to know that.

But do corporate executives really make more?

For many of our politicians the salary and perks are chicken feed.

If the government shuts down, whoopie do. If WalMart and BoA shuts down we will know that the end of days are upon us.

Posted by: jlw at February 26, 2011 4:57 PM
Comment #319287


C&J, the median income? Inflation? Is there no correlation between the two? Has one risen faster than the other? The rising gap between workers and wealth seems to indicate that there is a correlation and that one has been rising faster than the other.

The designation ordinary worker is shifting fast and will soon include many college educated workers. Teachers have just become ordinary workers. Imports can greatly accelerate this shift. I expect they will.

A raise in the minimum wage means workers will be paying more for food, rent and utilities.

No raise in the minimum wage means workers will be paying more for food, rent and utilities.

Posted by: jlw at February 26, 2011 5:27 PM
Comment #319293

j2t2, FDR in a wheel chair was a well kept secret from the majority of people. He would not have been elected if people knew he was in a wheelchair. There is a lot of privilage that allows people who do not work hard and study hard to gain an upper level management position. Politicians are included in that lot. Status should not guarantee the top spot. Princes and lords they are not. They are servants and should be the first to go in hard times.

Wages are hostage to a fiat money system. The U.S. refuses to back it’s money with gold since the 70’s. The price of gold then was $35 and ounce. That same ounce of gold today is over $1400. Did gold become more valuable or did the dollar become less valuable? I say the latter. Do we even have the gold or does it belong to other nations and we’re just securing it? Sure wages are going to suffer when inflation, generated by a Fed printing money out of thin air, is normal. Government does not lead the way in salary. Innovation, risk-taking, and determination lead the way. Expecting the government to force business to raise wages based on inflation is counter-productive and wrong. If our money was a sound money then wages could have stayed the same while prices go down because innovation and greater productivity increase supply. Inflation is robbing us of every penny innovation and hard work generates. Government takes a great share of what’s left with rules and regulations and also stifles competition, innovation, and ingenuity.

And you, j2t2 want to put the people who caused the mess up on a pedistal and try to convince us they deserve to be there? And you think we should pay them more to set an example!? That doesn’t make any sense to me.

Posted by: Weary Willie at February 26, 2011 10:08 PM
Comment #319298

Willie the gold standard ran it’s course, it is done. Time population, depression and wars will do that. We have to move on. Going back will not solve any problem, why do you think they go off of it to begin with? I realize there is an element in the country who insist this is the problem but I just don’t believe it. It seems to me it is those that are selling gold, I wonder if there is a connection?

As far as innovation I am sure we have had many innovations over the years,but it seems these big business innovations include off shoring, downsizing, buying out the competition, union busting, shipping technology to child labor countries and other tactics which IMHO are less than honorable innovations. You cam blame all of this on the gold standard/inflation but lets face it it doesn’t do our country any good.

“Government takes a great share of what’s left with rules and regulations and also stifles competition, innovation, and ingenuity.”

Well that certainly is the corporatist line, Weary. right out of Ayn Rand, but I find it to be not completely truthful. Many larger corporations pay no taxes at all to this country. They use the services and pay no taxes. We also need to face the fact that if people want to do business that does not mean they get a free pass on polluting the water or tainting the water supply as an example.

I ran projects for years Weary I know about complying with a multitude of rules and regulations and was frustrated with many. However so did those we competed against. So I would say that many times the rules level the playing field. Those that squawked the most were the ones that I found that wanted to “do the wrong thing” shall we say because they were greedy.

Sometimes Weary these buzzwords you hear like “innovation” or “stifles competition” are just that. Sometimes it is a two way street, the corporations want to stifle competition and innovation(of others of course) and do so by writing the rules and regulations you speak of. If we get them out of buying our representatives we could be on our way to fixing some of these issues. But as long as people continue to believe this type of stuff is all one sided it seems it will only get worse.

I really don’t put politicians on pedestals, Weary, I just don’t believe everything I hear from corporate America especially when there is a buck to be made. I try to use the “follow the money” rule to determine who is speaking with a forked tongue and most of the time it is obvious that it’s not the feds. After all rules and regulations were put in place, for the most part because of business types doing the wrong thing Weary.

Speaking of pedestals it seems to me you put these corporations on a pedestal. What do you think?

Posted by: j2t2 at February 26, 2011 11:40 PM
Comment #319302

j2t2,
I don’t know if bringing back the gold standard is the solution……but I do know that untrammeled money-printing is the problem!! Actually, not THE problem. What happens when we have to buy, say Euros, or a combination “basket” currency to purchase oil with? I suggest that replacing the dollar as the world’s reserve currency would bring this country to it’s knees. I suggest that there would be nobody calling to replace the dollar as the world reserve currency if Nixon had not taken us off the gold standard.

For years my tea party/libertarian brothers have been sending me emails about “the end of the world as we know it”, peppered with references to “sheeple”, etc. These really turned my stomach, because of their strident political bent, referring to the “socialist stinkpot in washington, etc. etc.

After doing a lot of research, I now believe we are on the brink of a complete financial collapse.The CPI does not include energy prices, nor food. Therefore, inflation is recorded as being below three percent. WTF?!?! There is almost no possibility of the U.S. paying it’s debt off….it’s just too huge. Where are any viable solutions?
If (when) gas goes to $5 per gallon, the economy starts swirling down the crapper.

So, long story short, (and I know I’m a terribly disorganized writer) believing that fiat currency is not a problem (given that you think the gold standard is obsolete) is fantastical, far-fetched fantasy.

Once the currency is devalued, oil goes to 5-10 per gallon, the U.S. dollar loses it’s world reserve status (please refer to 5-10 gasoline), or inflation kicks in (Quantitative easing notwithstanding), the dominoes start falling.

Posted by: steve miller at February 27, 2011 9:07 AM
Comment #319309

Steve the gold standard is history not because I think it is but because it is. I am not trying to say it was the correct thing to do at the time, but we are where we are.
I think the financial problems the federal government faces stem from the “starve the beast” strategy we have been pursuing for years. Bad money management by design. At least it is the financial problem we can reasonably expect to address.

How would we implement a return to the gold standard? How do we not end up in a deflationary free fall if we return to the gold standard? Perhaps you can enlighten me, cause I just don’t see it happening. Until and unless the bottom falls out of course.

Posted by: j2t2 at February 27, 2011 2:07 PM
Comment #319314

The gold standard is history because it was convenient for the banking industry to implement fractional banking, and for the federal reserve to issue currency with, well, nothing backing it.

You have hit the nail on the head; we will revert to some kind of reality/precious metal-based economy when the scrip we now exchange amongst one another is proven to be worthless. It’s most of the way there already. It’s been very hard for me to grasp that silver and gold prices do not rise and fall, it is the worth of our currency that dictates how many frogskins you have to fork over to acquire real wealth.

I have resisted this reality for years, because of the political message that seemed to go along with the information, always peppered with references to “sheeple” and “socialist yatta yatta”. Now that I have started doing my own research, I am convinced that our paper currency has been plundered, and will fall…..hard.

Posted by: steve miller at February 27, 2011 4:40 PM
Comment #347771

We can do something about this. Join me by going to the website listed above and sign the petition to make sure that Congress must live in the same world that we do. Congress won’t fix it - so the people must forces the issue.

Posted by: Bruce Cooper at July 3, 2012 9:20 PM
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