Third Party & Independents Archives

Remembering Rosa

Yesterday Rosa Parks was laid to rest in her adopted home of Detroit Michigan. The service was a beautiful tribute to a lady that by virtue of a small gesture help change forever the way we look at each other. Most of us know the story. In early December of 1955, in Montgomery Alabama, Ms. Parks boarded the bus for home. Sitting in the segragated section, she was asked to give up her seat to a white man because the white section had filled up. Ms. Parks quietly refused and was arrested. She was convicted in a 30 minute trial of disorderly conduct and fined $14.00. Shortly thereafter, the Montgomery bus boycott was launched and among the organizers of that boycott was a young pastor named Martin Luther King.

We know what happens next. The bus boycott was ended after a case filed on behalf of three other women in Montgomery made it to the US Supreme Court which declared segregated public transportation unconstitutional. The case, Browder v. Gayle, became a watershed moment in the civil rights movement.

Ms. Parks was not a shrinking violet. She had been a member of the NAACP since 1943, and actively participated in the civil rights organization serving as the local chapter's secretary until 1957. Ms. Parks was not however, a force for political change in the manner that Dr. King and Malcolm X were. Her voice was quiet. She was small of stature and presence, but large of heart and courage. As is often the case, large movements are given their start by very small events. The refusal by Ms. Parks to give up her seat on that December day in 1955 was not part of some larger protest movement. The event occurred was because she was tired. She was tired physically because of a hard day's work, and tired emotionally because of the constant reminder that she and the rest of the blacks in Montgomery and indeed most of the South were treated as second class citizens.

Sometimes, it is the small stuff that makes the most impact. Sometimes it just takes a small, courageous and exhausted woman to help make us a better people and better nation. Rest in Peace Ms. Parks.

Posted by Dennis at November 2, 2005 5:32 PM
Comments
Comment #89875

Dennis,

Well said. Amen.

Posted by: ElliottBay at November 2, 2005 6:32 PM
Comment #89882

Thank God for folks like Rosa Parks.

Rest in peace.

Posted by: womanmarine at November 2, 2005 7:21 PM
Comment #89902

A true American Hero

Rest in peace Rosa Parks your lesson on life have not fell on deaf ears.

Posted by: Henry Schlatman at November 2, 2005 8:17 PM
Comment #89911

Well said.

I agree, Rosa Parks is a true American Hero, may she rest in peace.

Posted by: Mike Tate at November 2, 2005 8:44 PM
Comment #89919

Wonderful memorial article Dennis. I believe she will live on in our hearts as a hero for many generations to come.

Rest in peace Rosa.

Posted by: Taylor at November 2, 2005 9:15 PM
Comment #89944

Browder v. Gayle is a fine example of Judicial Activism at Work. This is what happens when Liberal Judges make Law instead of interpret them. The Rights of the State of Alabama were trampled that day in 1955. This is nothing more than the Federal Government taking over.

However, there is hope!!! Soon the Supreme Court will once again became Conservative and States like Alabama can once again rule themselves.

Posted by: Aldous at November 2, 2005 11:04 PM
Comment #90030

Beautifully said, Dennis.

We learn in the retreating
How vast a one
Was recently among us.
A perished sun

Endears in the departure
How doubly more
Than all the golden presence
It was before!

- Emily Dickinson

A Lady of great Dignity and Grace
and a Catalyst of Change.
Thank You,
Rosa Parks.

Posted by: Adrienne at November 3, 2005 9:46 AM
Comment #90037

Rosa Parks was a universal icon, up there with Gandhi and Mandela. Her simple yet courageous but peaceful action caused a paradigm shift in individual minds but also in the mind of a nation. She is raised to the pantheon of Americas’ moral leaders for all time.

Ar Dheis Dé go raibh a anam.(may her soul be on God’s right side.)

Posted by: Paul in Euroland at November 3, 2005 10:05 AM
Comment #90052

If some of the political and civil rights activists of today would take a page from the Rosa Parks “how to” book, what a better world we would live in.

Posted by: steve smith at November 3, 2005 10:49 AM
Comment #90078

A little Black lady refuses to stand up on a bus because as she said “I was to tired to stand” and a movement is born that changes the coarse of a country.
What a legecy.

Posted by: Ron Brown at November 3, 2005 12:15 PM
Comment #90096

Ron Brown,

She was TOO tired to stand. And she was tired not just in body, but in her soul, of being treated like a second class citizen.
It’s the COURSE of a country. Not coarse. Coarse means rough, crude, or unrefined. For instance, someone belittling a heroic figure who has just died might be considered coarse.
It’s not a legecy, it’s a LEGACY.
And though you may not see it, Rosa Parks, through courageous civil disobedience, left behind her a very proud one indeed.

Posted by: Adrienne at November 3, 2005 1:09 PM
Comment #90098

Ron, I knoe whut ya meen.
But, wach out, the grammer and spelleeng polize are on tha loose.

Posted by: d.a.n at November 3, 2005 1:18 PM
Comment #90103

Sometimes ignorance overwhelms me, d.a.n.

Posted by: Adrienne at November 3, 2005 1:27 PM
Comment #90104

Rosa Parks inspired a nation to fight for civil rights. The bus incident led to the formation of the Montgomery Improvement Association, led by the young pastor of the Dexter Avenue Baptist Church, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.
We are grateful for her courage that improved so many lives.

___________________________________________
NOTE: $14 in 1955 is equal to $97 today in 2005.
So, it was not a small fine, either.

Posted by: d.a.n at November 3, 2005 1:28 PM
Comment #90109

It’s interesting to me how things so small and routine can turn into significant events. I wonder what our nation and indeed our worldwould be like if just 1 of every 100 of us who experienced some level of injustice like this responded in the manner she did.

I discussed this story with my kids and have asked them to think about what they would do in such a circumstance. All of them were completely apalled that something like that could have actually occurred even 50 years ago. Perhaps, we’ve made some progress after all.

We need to celebrate these heroes when we find them. They are the ones who give the reality to the idea of freedom that we cherish so much.

Posted by: Dennis at November 3, 2005 1:38 PM
Comment #90112

I don’t think Ron was belittling her; I think he was making a point about how small a seemingly small event can change the course of history. At least I hope that’s what he meant. With luck he’ll clarify. With a better spelled post, of course.


If some of the political and civil rights activists of today would take a page from the Rosa Parks “how to” book, what a better world we would live in.

Well said. Rosa didn’t organize angry protests, threaten violence or make unfounded accusations against people for political reasons. All she did was live her life the way she saw fit. Yet she was the one who made a difference.
By doing nothing but sit there for a short time, she made more of a difference, and indeed more of a statement, than today’s civil rights “leaders” ever could. Inactions speak louder than words sometimes.

Thank you Rosa. Your seemingly small but, in reality, very large contribution will never be forgotten.

Posted by: TheTraveler at November 3, 2005 1:43 PM
Comment #90121

If anyone would like to see the funeral service of Rosa Parks check out www.democracynow.org

Posted by: republicansareracist at November 3, 2005 2:23 PM
Comment #90125

republicansareracist,

I wish you’d change your screen name. It really doesn’t belong in this of all threads (see what I said earlier about not making unfounded accusations about people for political reasons).

If you really believe what your screen name implies you do, what makes your broad stereotyping different than that of a raciest? Simple: nothing.

Posted by: TheTraveler at November 3, 2005 2:42 PM
Comment #90126

When did calling someone a racist make that person a racist? Not all Republicans are white; I’m not talking about a race but an ideology, particularly racism-conservatism. Check out www.democracynow.org maybe that will open your eyes.

Posted by: republicansareracist at November 3, 2005 2:49 PM
Comment #90134

Rosa broke the rules. The rule may have been a bad one but the facts are, you people are glorifying lawlessness.

Posted by: Ms Schwamp at November 3, 2005 3:22 PM
Comment #90137

Ms. Schwamp, thanks for reenforcing what I’ve been saying.

Posted by: republicansareracist at November 3, 2005 3:25 PM
Comment #90139

republicansareracist,

You do not get it.

You are making a broad statement with no basis in fact. There are members of the republican party who are not racist, by making such a sweeping statement that is proven invalid by this simple fact you are doing nothing more than participating in the type of behavior that you pretending to deplore.

I suggest you either grow up, understand what you are talking about, show something to back up your ridiculous claim or move on to another forum where your type of ‘debate’ is much more appreciated.

This is not the time, this is not the place. Thanks for playing, have a good day.

Posted by: Rhinehold at November 3, 2005 3:28 PM
Comment #90141

Unfounded stereotyping because of political association is no different than unfounded stereotyping because of race.

Posted by: TheTraveler at November 3, 2005 3:30 PM
Comment #90142

Ms. Schwamp,

A illegal law is not a rule to be followed. For example, say that someone passes a law that you cannot stand on your porch and tell anyone who comes to you about your religious faith. That law would be unconstitutional. Now, while that law is in effct, should you subject yourself to it or would you go ahead and do what you know is right and continue preaching your religion?

Or say you wrote a book about the research you had done that details that the 16th amendment was not validly ratified. Then the IRS used a section of their code to label you as supporting tax evasion (by reading your book somoene may feel that they don’t need to pay their taxes) and therefore an illegal tax shelter and they made your book ‘illegal’ to sell or own. Would you continue selling that book or would you burn every copy you wrote? (btw, this actually is happening to Bill Benson)

I’m sure I can come up with any number of examples…

Posted by: Rhinehold at November 3, 2005 3:36 PM
Comment #90144

I don’t think Ron was belittling her; I think he was making a point about how small a seemingly small event can change the course of history. At least I hope thatⳠwhat he meant. With luck he’ll clarify. With a better spelled post, of course.

I’ll clarify what I said, no problem. As for better spelling I wouldn’t bet on it as I’m the worlds worst speller. But I’ll try.

I said that a little Balck lady refuses to stand up on a bus because as she said “I was too tired to stand.” and a movement is born that changes the course of a country.
What a legacy.

I was in no way putting her down. Anyone who has bothered to read some of my lastest post will know that I don’t put people down because of their race.
But it seems some folks cann’t take what I say and leave at that. That’s there problem not mine.


Adrienne
And she was tired not just in body, but in her soul, of being treated like a second class citizen.

I wouldn’t doubt that for a moment.


d.a.n
Ron, I knoe whut ya meen.
But, wach out, the grammer and spelleeng polize are on tha loose.

I no waht you maen abuot teh gremmar and spelleeng polizce.
I seems that the only time they come out is if they cann’t argue with what is said. So they pick at how it’s said.
That’s why I don’t pay them much mind.

Posted by: Ron Brown at November 3, 2005 3:39 PM
Comment #90147

Shwamp:
“Rosa broke the rules. The rule may have been a bad one but the facts are, you people are glorifying lawlessness.”

Yes, so did Oscar Schindler. We glorify his “lawlessness” too.

Rhinehold:
“A illegal law is not a rule to be followed.”

Damn right, it isn’t. Illegal, racist or ridiculously stupid rules (like the one against the use of medical marijuana for people with cancer and Aids) are never to be followed.

Posted by: Adrienne at November 3, 2005 3:45 PM
Comment #90153

Ron Brown:
“they pick at how it’s said.”

Yes. I did’nt understand why you needed to tell us that Rosa Parks was “Black” (or little for that matter). And when you said that she “refuses to stand up on a bus” I found it incomplete, because she was being expected to give it up so that a white man could have it instead. And when you said “What a legacy” I thought that implied that you felt there really wasn’t one to speak of. If I was wrong and misunderstood you, I apologize.

Posted by: Adrienne at November 3, 2005 3:58 PM
Comment #90155
Ms. Schwamp, thanks for reenforcing what I’ve been saying.

republicansareracist,
I’m not a Republican. Maybe you’re not as smart as you think you are.

A illegal law is not a rule to be followed. For example, say that someone passes a law that you cannot stand on your porch and tell anyone who comes to you about your religious faith. That law would be unconstitutional.

At that time, it was not so clear that it was an outrageous rule. If it was, there would have been millions of Rosa Parks.

Is it okay for us today to go violating rules that we think in 50 years will be deemed ridiculous? Think about it.

Posted by: Ms Schwamp at November 3, 2005 3:59 PM
Comment #90156
“Rosa broke the rules. The rule may have been a bad one but the facts are, you people are glorifying lawlessness.”

Yes, so did Oscar Schindler. We glorify his “lawlessness” too.

So did George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Benjamin Franklin, John Adams, John Hancock, Thomas Payne, Paul Revere, and countless others.

Sometimes, to do what is right, you have to break the rules.

Posted by: Rob Cottrell at November 3, 2005 3:59 PM
Comment #90157

Oh, and thank you, Rosa Parks…

As a white man, I’d give up my seat for you any day.

Rest in peace. You’ve earned it.

Posted by: Rob Cottrell at November 3, 2005 4:01 PM
Comment #90162

Ms. Schwamp

It’s not what we think will be deemed by society as ridiculous, but what is ridiciulous, i.e. conservatism. This society was and still is founded on the ideas of justice, which you apparently don’t believe in.
Civil disobedience is the most noble form of revolt ever created. You should thank your lucky stars that it wasn’t something else.

Posted by: republicansareracist at November 3, 2005 4:07 PM
Comment #90163

Hey that Oscar Schindler biz is not a fair analogy.

But Adrienne’s medical marijuana is; she thinks its ridiculous and should not be complied with and I agree completely. But plenty of people dont. We all have our own ideas of rules that should be ignored. And when we do it, it’s called lawlessness, as opposed to abiding by democratic majorities.

You just cant admit that our society was just fine with Rosa giving up her seat.

The guilt is palpable.

Posted by: Ms Schwamp at November 3, 2005 4:09 PM
Comment #90165

Dumbass,

By what means are you considering conservatism is ridiculous? I’m not necessarily going to disagree with you but on the same token I have a strong belief that liberalism is equally as problematic. There are bits in each that are good and bits that are bad, which ones are you referring to?

Or, are you showing your inability formulate intellectual thought processes so you just take the easy road out and label those not conforming to your specific brand of political ilk as evil?

Btw, I’ve watched Democracy Now from time to time. It’s one of the most intellectually dishonest ‘news outlets’ I’ve ever seen. People want to copmlain about Fox News, who is a little right or CNN, who is a little left when the bleating sheep are all watching Democracy Now…

Posted by: Rhinehold at November 3, 2005 4:14 PM
Comment #90166
Civil disobedience is the most noble form of revolt ever created.

Rioting is the means of change in a democracy? I’ve heard it all now.

Posted by: Ms Schwamp at November 3, 2005 4:14 PM
Comment #90167

Oh, it appears that on my previous comment I used the wrong name to address ‘republicansareracists’, I apologize, but I think you can see where I got the two names confused.

Posted by: Rhinehold at November 3, 2005 4:15 PM
Comment #90168

Civil Disobedience != Rioting. Ghandi committed civil disobedience. The LA riots were just people trying to scam some free junk and burn things.

Posted by: Rhinehold at November 3, 2005 4:16 PM
Comment #90169

“Hey that Oscar Schindler biz is not a fair analogy.”

Why isn’t it fair? Because it’s so apt?

“You just cant admit that our society was just fine with Rosa giving up her seat.”

JUST FINE? Just fine for WHO?

“The guilt is palpable.”

Remove “guilt” and replace it with “callousness” and the shoe fits perfectly.

Posted by: Adrienne at November 3, 2005 4:18 PM
Comment #90176

Adrienne
Apology excepted. Maybe I should have more precise in my post.


Posted by: Ron Brown at November 3, 2005 4:25 PM
Comment #90177

“Why isn’t it fair? Because it’s so apt?”

apt if murder is analogous to seating assignments.

“JUST FINE? Just fine for WHO?”

Whatever good old boys made the rule. You still cant face it. You’re in Nation denial.

“Remove “guilt” and replace it with “callousness” and the shoe fits perfectly.”

Im the callous one but your feeling the guilt. Because your country was demonstrating racism and you are so embarassed you can’t acknowledge the truth.

Posted by: Ms Schwamp at November 3, 2005 4:27 PM
Comment #90185

Ms. Schwamp,

Rioting is not civil disobedience. Henry David Thoreau is the founder of this idea, I’d suggest you look into it.

Rhinehold

Thanks for that comment. I’ll point you to the article of “Black Viewpoint Discrination” I’ve made many comments on how this actually is. I’m suppose to be studying right now and really don’t have time to go through it, but I’ll try to later.

Sincerely,

REPUBLICANS ARE RACIST

Posted by: republicansareracist at November 3, 2005 4:38 PM
Comment #90190

“apt if murder is analogous to seating assignments.”

Oh it is. Just ask Emmet Till. Or Medgar Evers. Or Goodwin, Chaney, and Schwerner. Or Martin Luther King.

“JUST FINE? Just fine for WHO?”

“Whatever good old boys made the rule.”

And that made our society just fine to you. Got it.

“You still cant face it. You’re in Nation denial.”

Yeah. It’s a horrible blot. But, thank heavens I’m a Liberal! We’re never done striving toward giving meaning to the term “all men are created equal”.

“Im the callous one”

Bingo!

“but your feeling the guilt.”

No, I’m feeling the disgust.

“Because your country was demonstrating racism and you are so embarassed”

No, because the real embarassment is that fifty years after Rosa Parks refused to give up her seat to a white man, this conversation is actually taking place.

“you can’t acknowledge the truth.”

Acknowledging something is the only way change ever happens. And change is what Liberals are all about.

Posted by: Adrienne at November 3, 2005 4:57 PM
Comment #90199
Rosa broke the rules. The rule may have been a bad one but the facts are, you people are glorifying lawlessness.

Is that statement for real ?
I knew there was something fundamentally wrong with other posts from a similar origin, but that now confirms it.
How revealing. Absolutely unbelievable.

Posted by: d.a.n at November 3, 2005 5:18 PM
Comment #90203

I don’t know how many of yaall grew up in the South before the 70’s.
As a Southerner that grew up during the 50’s and 60’s I was an exception because I wasnt’ raised to be racist. I got my mouth washed out with soap when I was around 6 or 7 because I said the N word and Momma heard me. And I was taught that EVERY ONE had the right to dignity and liberity.
But not every one was. A hole heap were taught that Blacks weren’t even people and needed to be kept in their place. As a result I have experinced seeing racism at it worst. Being White none was directed at me personally. I could have gotten away with things that Blacks would’ve paid dearly for, and did. Both, I got away with it, and Blacks paid dearly for doing it.
I’ve seen Black men whipped in the middle of the street because they looked a White women in the face. The same thing happened if they looked a White man in the face, just not as bad. I’ve seen pregnant Black women kicked to the ground because they didn’t move out of the way of a White person fast enough. I’ve seen the gas satation restrooms marked, White Gentlemen, White Ladies, Niggers. I looked in one of the last one time to see what was in there. I wouldn’t have let Daddy’s pigs use it. I’ve seen the signs that told Blacks not to let the sun go down on their asses in town. These usually had racial slurs in their message. I’ve seen the burning crosses in front of the homes of Blacks because someone got the idea that they were an uppity …………… I’m glad that I didn’t see our neighbors body swinging from the tree in front of his home because he happened to walk into his employers barn and catch the man’s wife naked with another neighbor. He was hanged because he looked at a naked White women. I’ve seen the falling down schools that Black kids were forced to attend.
I’ve seen this crap at it’s worst. But it was even worse for the people it was happening too. And it was because they weren’t White.
When Rosa Parks refused to stand up on that bus, for what ever reason, right or wrong, she made a stand that started a movement that has brought that kind of BS to an end.
Now we need to work on erasing the racism that still exist on ALL sides. This would be the best tribute that this country could give Rosa Parks.

Posted by: Ron Brown at November 3, 2005 5:27 PM
Comment #90206

“Civil disobedience is the most noble form of revolt ever created.
Rioting is the means of change in a democracy? I’ve heard it all now.

Posted by Ms Schwamp at November 3, 2005 04:14 PM”

——————————
How does one define a riot?

Several hundred years ago, a small group of people disgusted with an almost inconsequential tax levied on their tea imports illegally boarded the ships holding the tea and threw the cargo overboard. This relatively small event caused a chain reaction of behavior that allows you to vote, say what you want to say without fear of governmental reprisal, worship how you want to worship, live where you want to live and pursue the life you want for yourself and your family.

Not so long ago, several thousand Indians gathered at the sea to watch a solitary man make salt in defiance of the law. This “riot” helped spur a movement that freed a land of an occupier and ushered in the largest democracy in the world.

Even more recent, a young black pastor incited people to take a walk to Selma Alabama in an effort to obtain fairness in voter registration and voting.

All of these events could be considered “riots”. Were they violent? Yes, they were. Did they move the idea of Democracy forward towards a more inclusive view of human rights? I’d have to say yes as well.

Posted by: Dennis at November 3, 2005 5:28 PM
Comment #90210
Now we need to work on erasing the racism that still exist on ALL sides. This would be the best tribute that this country could give Rosa Parks.
Yes, that would be a good tribute. There’s a long way to go still. Posted by: d.a.n at November 3, 2005 5:35 PM
Comment #90212

I’ve seen this crap at it’s worst. But it was even worse for the people it was happening too. And it was because they weren’t White.
When Rosa Parks refused to stand up on that bus, for what ever reason, right or wrong, she made a stand that started a movement that has brought that kind of BS to an end.
Now we need to work on erasing the racism that still exist on ALL sides. This would be the best tribute that this country could give Rosa Parks.

Posted by Ron Brown at November 3, 2005 05:27 PM

———————————-

My god Ron, I can’t imagine having to watch that. I grew up and still live in Texas, and we had our share of visible racism, but thankfully had past the point of segregation. Thanks for the story and keep telling it. We can’t let this period of our history fade from our memories. When that happens these things have a habit of showing up again.

thanks for your story.


Dennis

Posted by: Dennis at November 3, 2005 5:45 PM
Comment #90226

Great post, Ron Brown. (And now I’m even more sorry for misunderstanding you before!)

Posted by: Adrienne at November 3, 2005 6:44 PM
Comment #90362

We do have a long way to go d.a.n.


Thanks for the story and keep telling it. We can’t let this period of our history fade from our memories. When that happens these things have a habit of showing up again.

Dennis, You don’t know how bad I wish I could forget it.

No problem at all Adrienne

Posted by: Ron Brown at November 3, 2005 9:40 PM
Comment #90405

Ms Schwamp-

Rosa Parks broke an unjust rule sitting down AND accepted the consequences of her action by being jailed AND simultaneously stood up for true justice for ALL by calling for her pastor (MLK) from jail. Rev. Martin Luther King Jr organized the PEACEFUL bus boycott and PEACEFUL demonstrations.

Rosa Parks did not start riots or promote violence. People fighting to keep segregation started the violence and riots.

May Rosa Parks’ memory be eternal.

Posted by: jo at November 4, 2005 5:32 AM
Comment #90465

Given the methods that Rosa Parks used to make her point, and made it was and her unselfish contribution to the civil rights movement I was slightly dissappointed that the likes of Jesse Jackson and Al Sharpton, in view of their more flamboyant and often inflammatory methods advancing the same cause, were on hand to honor Rosa.

Posted by: steve smith at November 4, 2005 10:53 AM
Comment #90478

Ms Schwamp

Wow. It’s hard to understand why you don’t see the importance of Rosa Park’s civil disobedience and how significant it is. What would you have preferred she’d done instead?

————————————————

Republicansareracist,

It’s a shame you choose such a divisive username as it seems that you do have some good things to say. It’s too bad, because the inflammatory nature of your name and some of your comments immediately discredits you as an influential voice. Something to consider if you want that voice to be heard, or taken seriously (by those that agree and disagree with you).

————————————————————

|||Acknowledging something is the only way change ever happens. And change is what Liberals are all about.|||

Partially true; classic liberalism is about “all men are created equally”, contemporary liberalism is about distributing wealth and entitlements equally; in other words, implementing socialism.

Posted by: brando at November 4, 2005 12:12 PM
Comment #90533

Brando,

Your right that some of my comments are inflammatory, but the words I said have been said for hundreds of years. There comes a point where you have to be blunt. I’ve made these comments before and no one acknowledges what I have said. I’m tired of trying to be gentle with people’s feelings when the level of injustice that is served, not only to minorities but to the majority, is at such a level that I feel were being spit on by the government on a daily basis. Maybe not all Republicans are racist but they embrace an ideology that is racist. As long as people embrace this ideology I will continue to call them racist whether they know it or not.

Ron,

I still wonder if your a Republican. You said some provocative things that I completely agree with.

Sincerely,

REPUBLICANSARERACIST


Posted by: republicansareracist at November 4, 2005 3:06 PM
Comment #90539

I’d like to add a post script to my post last night.
The incidents I described were committed by only the most biggotted of the Whites, which thankfully was and stil is a miniorty. But the fact that these things happened and were tolarated by most Whites, who would never do anything like that, speaks volumes.

Posted by: Ron Brown at November 4, 2005 3:19 PM
Comment #90540

Ron,

I still wonder if your a Republican. You said some provocative things that I completely agree with.

Sincerely,

REPUBLICANSARERACIST

No I’m not a Republican. I’m an independant Conservitve. I left the Republican party in 1970 because of their liberial views.

Posted by: Ron Brown at November 4, 2005 3:22 PM
Comment #90547

Ron,

Do you not see how conservatism is a reenforcement of the status quo? I see nothing wrong with holding traditional values such as Christianity in your heart, hell I love Jesus, but when one tries to apply that belief into others hearts it causes large problems. I also believe Christianity has been transformed by the Republican party in ways that make it almost unrecognizable. If you truly believe that reform is needed-does that not go against the grain of conservatism?
Can you give examples how the Republican Party enforces liberal values? I see no sign of liberalism in the Republican Party. If you say balancing the budget is a conservative ideal, I’ll go crazy, so please don’t say that.
Do you embrace the Reform Party. I’ve always had a hard time understanding the Reform Party as a conservative platform. Patrick Buchanan, I’ve never agreed with, but respected for his intellect. Also, he was friends with one of my all time favorite writers.
The Libertarian Party is a liberal party in my opinion. The root of the word is liberal and I just think it is hard to get past that. If you were saying that the Republican Party holds to many liberal views economically, I concur, but this is classical liberalism. I do not, nor will I ever, agree with this idea. A worldly term of American foreign policy is neoliberalism, which I feel the Libertarian Party embraces. I would say it is fair to argue that both mainstream parties embrace this economic ideal. I disagree with it full heartedly.
As a point you have made towards me on numerous times generalizations are wrong. I do believe that point is correct except in the case of Republicans. The Democrats may be scumbags too, but it is a two party system. I will also pick the Democrats over the Republicans until the Republican party is just as influential as a third party (No offense to third parties). I personally feel that politics involves a large amount of personal growth through hard work, and that there is nothing wrong with changing your ideals. So I ask you and any Republican/Conservative why don’t you change your ideals?

Posted by: republicansareracist at November 4, 2005 3:55 PM
Comment #90562

republicansareracist
I have NEVER met a true Conservitive that would even think of tolerating the kind of crap that I discribed in my previous post.
True Conservitives ARE NOT against change as such. They just don’t see the need for alot of the changes that the Liberial think are so necessary. However, if a change is needed, such a racism, they will back it with everything they’ve got.
The problem is that, like Christianity, there are a lot of people that say they’re Conservitive that really aren’t.
There is also the problem with these idiot racist groups that claim to be Conservitive.
TRUE CONSERVITIVES ARE NOT RACIST!
And yes Conservitives DO want to see a balanced budget. This is one of many reason that Republicans aren’t Conservitve. I have seen any of them willing to do this. They give lip service to Conservitive values, but in pratice they are no different than the Democrats.
Just look at our current Congress and President. What have they been saying? Now, What are they doing? Can you see any difference between what they’re doing and what the Democrats have done when they were in power? If you can you doing better than me.

Posted by: Ron Brown at November 4, 2005 4:57 PM
Comment #90591

I see not much difference in elected repubicans and democrats today. Oh, they use the lables of Liberal and Conservatives as perjoratives against the other party. But really, they are cut from the same cloth. They seem to be entirely about either preservation of power or obtainment of power. When the power is achieved, then it’s payback time: Revenge for all who opposed, and patronage for all who supported. These people have developed an Oligarchy that is beholden only to those who can finance their quest for obtainment or retention of office and power. Mr. Delay, for example, is not a conservative. He cares little about conservation of anything. In fact, he is one of the most wasteful politicians in Washington. Would a true conservative accept a plane ride from DC to Houston that cost $13k? I think not. There are very few in Washington who I think really put forth their views responsibly and try to improve the lives of Americans. John McCain and Russ Feingold come to mind. As does Olympia Snow and Susan Collins.

It’s high time we had a fresh set of boots on the ground in Washington. The voting public needs to send strong message to the incumbents: Get Out. They’ve worn out their welcome in my opinion and have made Washington their own little playground with all the perks and power trips to satiate their ever enlarging egos.

Posted by: Dennis at November 4, 2005 6:59 PM
Comment #90635

http://voidnow.org

This better work.

Posted by: Ron Brown at November 4, 2005 9:55 PM
Comment #90661

“This better work.”

————-

Ron, if there is any time for it to work. Now’s the time. I think there is enough pent up anger in the voting population regardless of political view that sweeping incumbents from office is a possibility.

VOID’s a good start. We have to get Washington to remember that A. They work for us, and B. If they don’t do a good job for us, they’ll be given a chance to look for other employment.

It’s interesting isn’t it. This is one of the few organizations that judges itself and decides on it’s own benefits, pay scales, performance metrics, etc. I know we have elections, but with a 98%+ incumbency rate, someone really has to do something stupid to lose an election.

I believe in pay for performance. We need to get our elected employees working for us to remember who the boss actually is. Maybe now is the time.

Posted by: Dennis at November 5, 2005 7:55 AM
Comment #90672

|||They seem to be entirely about either preservation of power or obtainment of power.|||

The only difference is that republicans exploit the religious right to obtain this power and democrats exploit the working class and minority groups to obtain it. “If you vote for them the lack of morality will destroy america!” or “if you vote for them, they will take away all your rights!” = manipulation. The saddest part is how so many people are still falling for it on both sides.

Posted by: brando at November 5, 2005 11:17 AM
Comment #90679

Dennis
Your right. But I was trying to get the link to work and was getting a little frustrated with it.
I don’t know what happened to the first two tries.

Posted by: Ron Brown at November 5, 2005 12:06 PM
Comment #90775

Not only should we have pay for performance as Dennis suggests but, accountability as well. In your work you very likely get an annual review. With this comes constructive criticism, accolades if applicable, possibly a wage increase, but always, a challenge to do better. Unanswered challenges often leads to probation and/or dismissal.

We need this kind of private sector procedure applied to politics/government. In the eyes of management we are transparent not translucent. We are accountable. VoidNow.org offers an alternative well worthwhile reveiwing.

Posted by: steve smith at November 6, 2005 11:06 AM
Comment #90777

To all of you posting anything but honor to Rosa Parks:

Shame on you!!

Your nit-picking 50 years after the fact and after the woman is dead is nasty and small.

Disgusting.

Posted by: womanmarine at November 6, 2005 11:15 AM
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