Millennials in the Workplace

It is a funny video. I don’t think that such bad work habits are limited to young people; I work with great young people. But all sorts of bad attitudes and feelings of entitlement have indeed seeped into our work culture. IMO -The only real way to do good is to find things you can do well and pursue excellence. Only in this way can you create the wealth - material, spiritual and/or intellectual. You should not seek success but seek to deserve success.

I know people who really think they are entitled to "mental health days." I used to call them vacations and I understand they are good things. But they are ... vacations. You don't get to take them when you feel stressed because you have too much work to do. When you have a lot of work to do is when you should be doing your work. When did it become okay to let down your side because you're sick of working so hard? There is time enough to rest when the work is done.

Henry Ford said, "The question, 'Who ought to be boss?', is like asking, 'Who ought to be the tenor in the quartet?' Obviously, the man who can sing tenor." This applies to jobs in general. You don't have a right to the job you want; you have a responsibility to do the job you have right. I still believe in the idea of "a calling."

And I have some confidence in the Millennial generation. Those are my kids and I have a lot of contact with such young people. I have developed a speech with ideas similar to those I mentioned above. When I talk to young people, I find them eager to embrace the idea of a "calling." It just has not been explained to them. I think that the education establishment has let them down, told them that all ideas are equally good and we should not judge behaviors. Of course, there are such things as stupid ideas and dumb questions and most people's "natural" behavior is not good.

You have to work at building your character. You are NOT good enough being yourself. You should strive to be better.

The whole way many people look at things is wrong. When we look at failures or people in poverty, we study what is holding them back. This is mostly a waste of time and leads to bad conclusions and poor policy. It would be much better to study successful people and find lesson in what they have done. Apply them more generally.

As a poor kid myself, I didn't know much about success. My father (to his credit) taught me to work hard, but he had lots of bad attitudes. They were not completely wrong, but they were mis-targeted.

For example - he told me that I should do what I loved. This is almost right, but it is better understood as "Love what you do." The first formulation leads people to seek work in "fun" things; the second lets you develop skills that lead to real joy and success. I love sitting around and drinking beer, but that is not a valid career choice and it will not make me happy in the long run if I do mostly that.

His worst advice was telling me the poor kids didn't get the breaks and that it was no use trying. Here, again, he had a point but off target. Poor kids have fewer ready-made connections. They have to develop them. The biggest advantage the rich kids have is knowledge and attitudes. Poor kids can develop these by watching successful people and adapting their attitudes and behaviors. But they can only do that if they are willing to take the time to observe, learn, improvise, adapt and change. If they believe they are okay as they are or that their failure is imposed by outside forces, they can never succeed.

We have to be prepared to be better tomorrow than we are today and better than most people at the things we do well. If not, find something you do better.

When I am unsuccessful, I try to figure out what I did that I can change to be better next time. I do the same when I am successful.

I think one big reason our culture of work has declined is that we are farther from the land. A farmer can complain about the weather, but he cannot force it to change with protests of whining. You can also tell how hard a farmer works by looking at his fields. Few people today have such clear measures.

One more thing about the young generation. I recall being young. My generation was horrible. We were a bunch of dirty, lazy hippies. But we came out of that funk. Every generation has its heroes and its dogs.

Young people today are suffering hard times, as we did in the 1970s. This bad economy has lasted longer than any that young people have seen, but it will not be forever. Economies eventually recover and America's best days are yet to come. My kids generation will build that future.

Posted by Christine & John at August 3, 2013 6:58 AM
Comments
Comment #369184

Who aspires to be a burger flipper? Who develops their character so they can drown in a low wage burger flipping job?

Lets face it C&J the choice these youngsters have today is years in college and the debt that goes with it or a menial low wage job. You can have all the character in the world but flipping burgers just doesn’t pay that well. Instead of making excuses for the results of unfettered capitalism why not fix it instead? Instead of telling us income inequality is such a good thing for us why not fix it instead?

BTW while I did enjoy your inspirational and sound advice, it only serves to put a band aid on the problem IMHO.

Posted by: j2t2 at August 3, 2013 8:44 AM
Comment #369185

j2t2

I was a burger flipper. You don’t have to stay at that, but when you do that job, you should try to do it well.

One way to fix income inequality is to change the behaviors. Behavior is complex and sometimes “generosity & tolerance” can cause more trouble than it cures.

I am a generous person in the traditional way, so much so that my relatives and co-workers feel it necessary to “protect” me from those who would take advantage. But I have been rethinking this for several years now. Giving people stuff w/o strings attached is not generous. My generosity may have been harmful to some of the people I am trying to help if it takes away their feelings of obligation or reciprocity.

What we need to do is to make it simpler for people to prosper. This includes things like education, but it also means to get out of their way and let them fail. America should not be the land of guaranteed success, but rather the land of many opportunities.

I have what I call a “Gold’s gym rule.” When you are at the gym, you see lots of people hanging around. How do you know who is strong? Ask him to pick up the weight. It doesn’t matter how much he claims to want to lift, the time he spends in the gym or anything about his personal life. Either lift it or not. To the extent possible, we should simply apply that rule.

Chrissy works in HR. The have to have lots of people like her because laws are so complicated. I think she does good work, but would it not be better if people could just figure out the rules w/o the help of experts? How about if you could just hire the guy who can lift the weight and not worry about being sued by the one who cannot? This is how America was when we had more growth and less inequality.

Posted by: CJ at August 3, 2013 9:51 AM
Comment #369188

C&J, You continue to dance around the problem with witticisms rather than to face the problem head on. Unfettered capitalism has led the US down the wrong path. You can recite self help mantras as long as you want but unless we fix the problem the next generation will be burger flippers unless they leave the country.The educated will be paid less unless they are at the top of the food chain. Income inequality does that to a country.

Posted by: j2t2 at August 3, 2013 2:24 PM
Comment #369189

Since the subject of this post involves the workplace, I figured I would go off subject briefly to deal with a new Alabama law dealing with the work place. Sometimes it is just so hard to keep up with the BS put out by SD, AD, phx8, and j2t2. I explained in another post that everything is a crisis with the left. Mr. Daugherty, in his own post, predicts the killing of students in the public schools by teachers who either have their weapons taken away by students, or by teachers who go rogue. This Alabama Law is a perfect example of the left going into crisis mode and predicting Trayvon Martin style murders all over the state of Alabama.

Alabama gun owners have taken back some of their rights.

A new concealed carry law, known as the “guns in the parking lot act” went into effect today allowing Alabamans to keep concealed pistols locked in their car while at work, even if their employer previously prohibited the act.

The sponsor of the law, Scott Beason, says the purpose of the law is “to make sure the right of law-abiding citizens to carry a firearm and defend their families is clear.” This bill did not pass the state house easily. It ended as a struggle between 2nd amendment groups, led by the National Rifle Association, against law enforcement and business groups.

Opposing Democrats waived the Trevon Martin flag pronouncing this law, coupled with Alabama’s already existing “stand your ground” law, would be the cause of a rash of “Trevon style murders”.

Isn’t it great when freedom loving Americans win over socialists?

Posted by: Political Hostage at August 3, 2013 2:35 PM
Comment #369190
Economies eventually recover and America’s best days are yet to come. My kids generation will build that future.

You are lucky you write for conservatives as facts aren’t needed to fool them.

http://www.economist.com/news/21566430-where-be-born-2013-lottery-life

Posted by: j2t2 at August 3, 2013 2:42 PM
Comment #369191

j2t2

I have never lived in a place with unfettered capitalism. The U.S. certainly has not ever had it and certainty not in my lifetime.

Our system is in need of perpetual renewal and it perpetually renews. At this time, I believe we have to fix some structural problems, mostly related to poor public education. Much of this involved reforming schools, which will require that conservatives return faith to public schools and liberals break with the morbid hand of teachers’ unions.

Recent years seem a lot like the 1970s, which also sucked and when people told young people like I was then that we would become a nation of burger flippers.

Income inequality is a complex issue. It has increased in most of the world, probably mostly related to globalization, but also related to things like opportunities for women and massive immigration. Some things we cannot and don’t want to change. Others are in process of changing already. For example, the massive and largely unskilled wave of immigrants is probably over for now. We will be in a consolidation phase.

Diversity and even quick economic growth creates inequality. We will probably have less of both those things in the next twenty years.

Posted by: CJ at August 3, 2013 2:48 PM
Comment #369193

j2t2

Re the Economist - We are talking about the future. I have confidence in my country.

Beyond that, we are not near the bottom in that ranking. We are beat out by places like Switzerland or Norway, which are nice but kind of small population. America will still provide opportunities, as it has always.

As I wrote above, I became an adult in the 1970s, when “experts” told me that poor kids like me didn’t have much of a chance and many predicted the imminent ecological or economic collapse of our way of life.

Inequality bothers me not all that much, BTW. In fact, I think it is often a good thing.

Posted by: CJ at August 3, 2013 3:11 PM
Comment #369195

A Millenial’s guide to millenials:

We took you seriously. We went to college, got degrees at great costs to ourselves, thought there’d be jobs. Why? You told us if we did the work, it would be there. Then you decided it would be cheaper to employ foreigners, whether here or abroad. You sent the jobs we wanted, we trained ourselves for at great cost overseas, or brought somebody here to take it.

You talk about leaving a future for our children, when you pontificate on our deficit, but even now, your sequester cuts are dragging down the economy, turning that already screwed up future we’re trying to recover into that much more of a challenge to heal. And all the while, you know what I hear? That the Republican Party wants to make my future Social Security and Medicare benefits into new cash cows for their contributors.

If you wonder why folks like me aren’t chomping at the bit to line up behind Republicans. Perhaps it’s because nothing about this country has really improved for most of us under them. We remember better, more prosperous childhoods and teen years followed by instability and disaster in our later years. We’re not old enough for our disaster to have been a Democratic Congress and a Democratic President’s fault. Instead, we’re faced with a bunch of people who screwed things up, and have not only been trying to avoid the reckoning from that, but won’t let policy move on.

We really don’t feel we have much to gain from the success of the GOP, and we have a lot to gain from its failure. Ironically, it’s only gotten worse since they convinced themselves to sabotage our generation’s political movement. We’re not falling back into love with Conservative policy, we’re only becoming angrier about it’s creeping paralysis.

Political Hostage-
So, even though one person doesn’t want guns on his property, you’re letting somebody carry them on it. Yay Freedom. Too bad the other fellow’s rights didn’t matter.

Posted by: Stephen Daugherty at August 3, 2013 9:09 PM
Comment #369200

Stephen

As I wrote in the other side, this hard time seems a lot like the 1970s to me. We also went to school and did the work only to find no good jobs. With my MA in history, I had a job stuffing papers at the night shift. My supervisor was an illegal alien. But things improved in 1982 and we had a quarter century of good times. Those were the good times you remember from your childhoods.

Re the deficit - take off your partisan blinders for a minute. I am the best friend you have. I understand the inter-generational bargain is been breached. I think that old people like me should ask less of young people, let them keep more of what they earn.

If you did the math, you would understand that higher deficits are going to cost you a lot more than they will cost us old guys. You should advocate reforming SS and shifting over to more defined contribution plans. You cannot afford to support me for those many years I am likely to live at your expense.

Posted by: CJ at August 3, 2013 10:49 PM
Comment #369202
Our system is in need of perpetual renewal and it perpetually renews. At this time, I believe we have to fix some structural problems, mostly related to poor public education. Much of this involved reforming schools, which will require that conservatives return faith to public schools and liberals break with the morbid hand of teachers’ unions.

C&J with your advanced degrees this is the best you can do? Conservatives have made a mockery of religion, using it as a tool to beat those that differ from them. Seriously conservatives tell us the bible says the world is 6000 years old, do you really want that in public schools. If it weren’t for the teachers union in many places, especially down south, this would be what is taught in public schools.

As I wrote above, I became an adult in the 1970s, when “experts” told me that poor kids like me didn’t have much of a chance and many predicted the imminent ecological or economic collapse of our way of life.

C&J your recall of the 70’s differs so much from mine. It was the 80’s when the inflation fighters caused the loss of a million jobs. I wasn’t out of work a day that I didn’t want to be out of work back in the 70’s. The pay was much better as were the benefits. Didn’t need to flip burgers for minimum wage as many 20 somethings do today. Perhaps you are so ensconced in the upper middle class that you cannot see what has happened since the 80’s. Income inequality has risen to pre-depression levels. To think that conservatives can solve the problem by bringing religion to the public school is as callous a solution as I have ever heard.

http://aattp.org/watch-the-daily-show-annihilate-callous-fox-hosts-for-berating-minimum-wage-workers/

http://nineinchnews.com/breaking-news-citing-competition-from-fox-news-the-onion-ceases-operations/

http://samuel-warde.com/2013/07/stephen-colberts-brilliant-mcminimum-wage-rant/

Posted by: j2t2 at August 3, 2013 11:54 PM
Comment #369204

j2t2, did you ever think that perhaps the human conscience is 6000 years old. You should quit being so narrow minded. Stop trying to justify your position by denigrating other’s.

Posted by: Weary Willie at August 4, 2013 4:22 AM
Comment #369205

j2t2

The decade 1974-83 were hard times for me and for Americans, with high inflation coupled with stagnation. They used to call it stagflation. That is when they invented the misery index, which included both inflation and unemployment . Maybe it is because I lived in the rust belt, where our industries were collapsing, maybe it was because I was unskilled and just entering the labor force, but I also note that the national unemployment rates and inflation both poked into double digits.

I flipped burger back then. I worked at McDonalds, for example. I got minimum wage the first three months and then they gave me raises. The other benefit was free lunch. I worked lunch shift five days a week and got to eat for free.

Re my middle class status - I am indeed financially secure. I figured that out only a few years ago. It was a surprise and a surprise to people who know my lifestyle. My son summed it up. He said that we lived modestly when we were poor and didn’t really change our lifestyle much when we became not poor. Many people with much lower incomes “enjoy” higher living standards. They should be more circumspect.

But I worry about my kids. They are looking for jobs now. My son just graduated with a history degree. He is working part time at Applebees (BTW - entry level pays more than minimum wage) and trying to get an entry level warehouse job at the Walmart distribution center, which may lead to management. My other son is studying computer engineering and will probably get - and deserve - a good paying job when he gets out. It is a hard course. My daughter has a entry level admin job. In a “normal” economy, she would have gotten ahead, but w/o growth and w/o anybody leaving, she is stagnant for now.

So I think I have a stake in today’s economy in a very real and personal way. I want to get the economy going and not for the rich, but for young people like my own kids. I don’t want the younger generation to be enslaved to paying too much of their income to old people like us, who had our chance during the good times from 1982-2007 to make our fortunes.

Re religion - that is a red herring in this particular debate. Teachers unions are not providing the thin red line against religion. Their priorities are protecting teacher jobs and union power. These need not be bad things, but - as I wrote before - the task comes first. The first goal is teaching kids in excellent ways. If that means that teacher jobs change and some move to careers better suited to their skills, that is something we should accept and embrace. We need to restructure our education system to include more flexibility, more distance learning, differential teacher pay etc. Teachers’ unions tend to stand in the way of these reforms. I watched attempted reforms in Washington DC, which has the distinction of having horrible schools AND paying some of the highest cost per student in the country.

Posted by: CJ at August 4, 2013 8:14 AM
Comment #369207

Weary you are scaring me here, talking like an uneducated YEC believer. While you can’t fool all the people all the time conservatives have proven time and again you can fool them most of the time.


“Since 1982, between 40% and 50% of adults in the United States say they hold the creationist view that “God created humans in their present form at one time within the last 10,000 years” when Gallup asked for their views on the origin and development of human beings.[8] As of 2012, the percentage of believers decreases as the level of education increases. Only 25% of respondents with postgraduate degrees believed compared with 52% of those with a high school education or less.[9] A 2011 Gallup survey reports that 30% of U.S. adults interpret the Bible literally.[10]”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Young_Earth_creationism


Re religion - that is a red herring in this particular debate.

I thought so as well when you brought it up. But the myth that religion has left the public schools causing the dumbing down of the American student is one that must be countered. Many Americans believe the gibberish C&J, it is a vicious circle we see as conservatives have attacked the public schools the past 40 years. They have dumbed down the population and it continues with the next generation, For the results of conservatism attack on education I suggest the movie Idiocracy.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BBvIweCIgwk

Posted by: j2t2 at August 4, 2013 9:24 AM
Comment #369208

>blockquote>I flipped burger back then. I worked at McDonalds, for example.

The difference between then and now is the McDonalsa job is not a starting point for most now it is the job they have as none other are available. Technology, Off shoring, population growth and globalization have taken a toll.

Posted by: j2t2 at August 4, 2013 9:44 AM
Comment #369211

j2t2

McDonald’s should not be a career choice for most people. In fact, I am distressed by the change. In the old days, McDonald’s was staffed by young people. Now it is full of immigrants working more or less for their jobs. I expect this might change now that the immigrant wave has stopped.

I did not bring up religion. I am agnostic about religion in school. I don’t think we should fight against it as much as some do, but I don’t think we need prayer led in school.

Public schools are very differentiated. Some public schools are very good; others are atrocious. Most conservatives send their kids to public schools and would like to improve them. But as we have spent more money on schools, performance has not improved a pace.

IMO, schools should teach basics and not worry about all those social things. My daughter in the top 1% in math. She didn’t learn it from me. She learned it in Poland, where the teachers didn’t have all those fancy things or methods. They taught it the old fashioned way and she learned well. We spend much more money, but get poorer results. Ask why and change that.

Posted by: CJ at August 4, 2013 11:59 AM
Comment #369213

Ah, a true Democratic. Pidgin hole the opponent. Declare your opponent a loon, crackpot, scary. Link your opponent with un-associated supporters and label them as ignorant, stupid, unbelievable, fools, i.e. YEC believer

Now, did I say there was nothing and then 6000 years ago there was a “big bang” and then the earth was here? No, I did not say there was a “big bang” and then the earth was here.

Did I denounce the “theory” that a man evolved from an ape? No, I did not denounce that “theology”.

What did happen 6000 years ago, j2t2?

The 4th millennium BC saw major changes in human culture. It marked the beginning of the Bronze Age and of writing. The city states of Sumer and the kingdom of Egypt were established and grew to prominence. Agriculture spread widely across Eurasia. World population in the course of the millennium doubled, approximately from 7 to 14 million people.
Based on studies by glaciologist Lonnie Thompson, professor at Ohio State University and researcher with the Byrd Polar Research Center, a number of indicators shows there was a global change in climate 5,200 years ago, probably due to a drop in solar energy output as hypothesized by Ohio State University.

Substantial occurrences, wouldn’t you say, j2t2? Occurrences that might bring about a substantial change in human evolution and spiritual thought, both. Yes? You could say it “created” a new age, a new beginning. Don’t you think, j2t2?

Or do you just want to criticize conservatives?


Posted by: Weary Willie at August 4, 2013 3:24 PM
Comment #369215
Now, did I say there was nothing and then 6000 years ago there was a “big bang” and then the earth was here?

No but they did.

…..You could say it “created” a new age, a new beginning. Don’t you think, j2t2?>

Yes you could but that isn’t what these guys are spreading Weary.


“Young Earth creationism (YEC) is the religious belief[1] that the Universe, Earth and all life on Earth were created by direct acts of the Abrahamic God during a relatively short period, sometime between 5,700 and 10,000 years ago.[2] Its primary adherents are those Christians and Jews[3] who, using a literal interpretation of the Genesis creation narrative as a basis, believe that God created the Earth in six 24-hour days.[4][5]”

Posted by: j2t2 at August 4, 2013 10:48 PM
Comment #369216

All conservatives now belong to this YEC? We’re now the YEC Party? You use a broad brush but very little paint when you attribute the beliefs of YEC to all conservatives.

Conservatives have made a mockery of religion, using it as a tool to beat those that differ from them. Seriously conservatives tell us the bible says the world is 6000 years old, do you really want that in public schools.

If anyone mocks religion it is liberals who want to destroy religion to satisfy their own thirst for power. It is the Democratics who use religion as a tool to beat those that differ from them. Geesh, j2t2! You’re reinforcing my belief that you and Stephen Daugherty are the same person. You are projecting your positions onto others just as he does!


28 Signs That U.S. Public Schools Are Rapidly Being Turned Into Indoctrination Centers And Prison Camps

Our children desperately need to focus on the basics such as reading, writing and math, but instead a whole host of politicians, “education officials” and teachers are constantly injecting as much propaganda as they possibly can into classroom instruction. Instead of learning how to think, our children are continually being told what to think.


U.S. PUBLIC SCHOOLS: PROGRESSIVE INDOCTRINATION CAMPS

For example, citing from the polling firm of Luntz Research, Dr. Black notes that the 57 percent of faculty members represented in our most esteemed universities are Democrats (only 3 percent Republican) and 64 percent identify themselves as liberal (only 6 percent conservative).

It’s no wonder, with figures like those, Christine & John are writing articles like this one. Consider the way j2t2 blankets all conservatives and labels them as scary, fools, and uneducated. How would the 3 percent Republican or the 6 percent conservative fair in their workplace environment?

Let’s take a look:

Harvard Steps Up Persecution of Conservatives

“In an editorial entitled ‘Warning: Do Not Enroll’ the enlightened future journalistic leaders of the Crimson staff take aim at alumni critics such as [Texas Senator Ted] Cruz, Mitt Romney, and Bill O’Reilly, calling their criticism (and this is rich, considering the recent cries of ‘McCarthyism’ against Cruz) ‘episodes of treachery.’”

Persecution and the Conservative Academic

In the end, Radosh concluded that most history professors discriminate actively and self-consciously against conservative academics. As Radosh wrote,

“The reason such professors will not hire conservatives is precisely because they do not want ‘other right-leading students’ to ‘follow them, into the academic profession,’ as Prof. Zimmerman hopes they will once conservative professors are hired. Does he really think people like Marilyn Young and Linda Gordon at NYU want anyone to challenge the ideological hegemony they now hold over molding students’ minds?”

Other sorts of conservative academics have long claimed to suffer from similar persecution.

Student Says School Persecuted Him for Being Conservative

William Felkner, 45, says the New England college and six professors wouldn’t approve his final project on welfare reform because he was on the “wrong” side of political issues and countered the school’s “progressive” liberal agenda.
Bruce Thyer, professor of social work and former dean at the College of Social Work at Florida State University, has written about discrimination against conservatives and against evangelical Christians in social work. He said discrimination hurts the profession.
“I have seen students actively discouraged from perusing social work because of their politically conservative views. I’ve also seen it happen with students who have held strong religious views,” he said. “I think that the profession is a great and noble discipline and there are occasional episodes like this that cast a black eye, and it’s really unnecessary.”
“You can say what you want about the war on poverty and how it’s going, but I think that it hasn’t gone well and I think there are better alternatives, and I think it was a shame I wasn’t even allowed to research and pursue those interests,” Felkner said. “It’s indoctrination.”

Telling people what to think is not education. j2t2, your continuous blanket criticism of conservatives illustrates the shallow and weak position you hold. It is not the position of the conservative you find “offensive”, it is the conservative. If you held the same opinion towards people of color you would be a racist.


Posted by: Weary Willie at August 5, 2013 2:17 AM
Comment #369219

j2t2

I suppose you are just trying to provoke a response, but such jokes are not all that funny, since I suspect you believe some of the underlying factors.

We have never in that past and do not now have unfettered capitalism. We have a free market, which includes rule of law, reasonable regulation, use of the market mechanism and free initiative by individuals. There really is no such thing as “capitalism”. There is no definitive text, nor rule book for it. It tends to be defined by those who don’t like it or don’t understand it.

Socialism is now a quaint ideology. We have come to understand that we cannot understand enough about how to work an economy for government planners to run the show. Where socialism has been applied (again, not in a complete form but primarily) the general result has been misery and there has usually been significant death and destruction.

A type of socialism worked for a while in Scandinavia, which had all the right conditions, including homogenous populations, no imminent military threats and profound respect for laws and regulations. But in recent years, Swedes and Norwegians have abandoned that system for a more flexible model.

My home city of Milwaukee had socialist mayors for many years. They did a good job with parks and sewers. It can work locally, but does scale well.

The Marxist variety of socialism is based on profound errors about how things work and its manifestations in the 20th Century were responsible for more civilian deaths than the wars of that very bloody century. Marxism should be avoided like the plague it is.

Posted by: CJ at August 5, 2013 5:56 AM
Comment #369220
j2t2

I suppose you are just trying to provoke a response,….

C&J, Read it again,it is a conservative troll that wrote and signed (using my name) #369218 not me.

Posted by: j2t2 at August 5, 2013 6:37 AM
Comment #369222

How do you know it was a conservative?

I can believe you didn’t write that because I don’t think you would reveal your true intent. It’s not like a Democratic to be so open about their ideals. But, how do you know it was a conservative?

Prove it was a conservative, j2t2. Back up your slander against conservatives with proof.

Posted by: Weary Willie at August 5, 2013 12:56 PM
Comment #369224

Americans have adopted the European entitlement mentality where they value the money of others more than they value their own individual rights. They measure success by the dollar and happiness by their personal comfort.
The rhetoric they spout about unfettered capitalism, fairness and the 99% is nothing but trying to shift the blame of their own failures onto everybody else.
Emotional pleas to take from those you envy, are easier than working for your own success.

The ‘millenials’ are the first generation where the majority embrace this way of “life.”

Posted by: kctim at August 5, 2013 2:16 PM
Comment #369225

j2t2

If it is not you, I will kill that comment.

Posted by: CJ at August 5, 2013 8:21 PM
Comment #369226

C&J, It was not my comment. Kill it.

How do you know it was a conservative?

Because a Democratic would not be so open about their ideals.

I can believe you didn’t write that because I don’t think you would reveal your true intent. It’s not like a Democratic to be so open about their ideals. But, how do you know it was a conservative?

Because a Democratic would not use another person name here on WB.

Prove it was a conservative, j2t2. Back up your slander against conservatives with proof.

Weary I didn’t slander “conservatives” I was talking specifically about the person who misused my name. Why not direct your anger towards the person guilty of misusing my name Weary instead of defending him or her.

Posted by: j2t2 at August 5, 2013 8:42 PM
Comment #369227

j2t2

Such deceptions poison debate. I am sorry some clown did that to you. His “email” was no@no.com, so I figure it was just some BS. There is no way that I can prevent those things in advance. Sorry.

Posted by: CJ at August 5, 2013 8:49 PM
Comment #369228

Weary Willie-
I’m sorry to say that the 6000 year figure is more theological in nature. But Global Warming, evolution? You use the word theology to reference religion, religion to reflect the strong belief folks have that these things are real. But does strong belief alone support these things? No, and that is the key difference between Science and Religion. You can feel strongly that Man evolved from creatures that were also the common ancestors of other creatures, separating from those species at certain points…

(and here’s the important part)

…but you can reinforce the legitimacy of that belief by appealing to objective evidence and data, and other similarly reinforced stuff, without appeal to magic, spirits, gods, or God himself to fill in the blanks.

A person appealing to a creationist theory must, at some point, stop following what the evidence says, and past a certain point say, “and here God miracles things into existence.”

Personally, I believe God set everything in motion and shaped things, but I believe this on faith, not because I reasoned this to be so. So I can accept the evidence-based, self-contained logic of science, because I do not put my faith at odds with what the truth of God’s green earth can prove. I can do this because from my point of view, man is so behind the curve on understanding how God works, and why God does the things God does, that if what we’re seeing out there is real, it must mean that there’s a more complicated meaning in the scriptures than just what we assumed to be there.

But you know what? That’s my personal view. Overall, I believe this: we should have these discussions as private matters. Children should be taught science in school, they should be taught an honest picture of history, matter of fact, rather than biased towards one side of the culture wars or another, and then, as they grow up, they should be prepared to think for them-damn-selves, because they won’t always have us around to do their thinking for them.

That’s the problem with too much of what we’ve set up in the education system and elsewhere. We’re so busy trying to indoctrinate in one direction or another, that we’re forgetting that these kids have to mature into independent adults, have to be able to generate their own strategies for confronting the world. And the world won’t merely hit them with easy problems, especially not this world.

Posted by: Stephen Daugherty at August 5, 2013 8:54 PM
Comment #369234
Children should be taught science in school, they should be taught an honest picture of history, matter of fact, rather than biased towards one side of the culture wars or another, and then, as they grow up, they should be prepared to think for them-damn-selves, because they won’t always have us around to do their thinking for them.

I can agree with this, Stephen Daugherty. Public schools have no business teaching children about sex. I had a biology class when I was in High School. I learned about our “ancestors” and how they have sex, but they did not teach me how to have sex. They taught me to respect the sanctity of marriage and why I shouldn’t have sex.

Politics should be a product of manners and courtesy and the debate of free thinking minds. It shouldn’t be framed around the party. The structure and mechanics of the functions of government should suffice.

Schools should also be much smaller and more numerous. I could never understand the sardine mentality of our public school systems. In any situation you have with more people than you can control there is an increase in that loss of control. My elementary education was provided by one teacher for every subject throughout the entire year. My teacher controlled over 40 students in one room. There was no moving from one room to another every 45 minutes. This instilled a lot of stability. My teacher was the master of my class and her word was final. There was no where else to go to get away from her.

I try to get everyone to see the value of home-schooling, or at least smaller schools. Children need consistency and discipline, and yes I mean a good swat on the ass, when appropriate. They also should be taught the basic rules defined in the ten commandments. What, of these 10 laws, could anyone disagree with? I suppose the first four would draw some attention, but how many people would want their child going around saying “God Damn It!” all the time.
But, of the others:
Don’t disrespect your parents
Don’t murder anyone
Don’t cheat on your spouse
Don’t steal from anyone
Don’t lie
Don’t turn green with envy
Who would not want their children to follow these simple rules? To throw out all ten because you take exception to the first four is doing a disservice to the child and to society as a whole.

Posted by: Weary Willie at August 6, 2013 2:33 AM
Comment #369238

Weary Willie-
Actually, we should have them teach kids about sex. The kinds of things kids get to believe in the absence of education… It can get ridiculous. Kids will educate each other, or start messing around with each other as bodies develop and the inclinations take hold.

They need to know the risks they are taking, and the results that could occur. They need to know about contraception, know why they need it. They need to realize that sex is one of the most complicated, biological, emotional, and ethical subjects out there, and that it should not be taken lightly.

As far as home-schooling goes, you can go for that if you want, but you pay the price for it, just as you pay the price for sending them to school beyond your control. But I’d make one thing clear: religion should be a matter for home, not school. Teach the science, and if you want your kid to believe that the science is BS, you teach them that at home. Don’t expect a government run enterprise to back your religious doctrine.

Posted by: Stephen Daugherty at August 6, 2013 1:39 PM
Comment #369242

http://www.cnsnews.com/news/article/rep-ellison-there-s-plenty-money-it-s-just-government-doesn-t-have-it

Rep. Ellison: ‘There’s Plenty of Money, It’s Just The Government Doesn’t Have It’

“Rep. Keith Ellison (D-Minn.) told a gathering of Democrats, “The bottom line is we’re not broke, there’s plenty of money, it’s just the government doesn’t have it.”

Ellison was discussing his ‘Inclusive Prosperity Act’ measure at the July 25th Progressive Democrats of America roundtable in Washington.

“People like, George Soros, Bill Gates, Warren Buffett, Paul Krugman, Joe Stiglitz, Jeffrey Sax, Dean Baker, Robert Poland, Larry Summers have said they all support a transaction tax,” Ellison said.

“The bottom line is we’re not broke, there’s plenty of money, it’s just the government doesn’t have it,” Ellison continued, “The government has a right, the government and the people of the United States have a right to run the programs of the United States. Health, welfare, housing – all these things.”

Ellison believes that “The government has a right” to take whatever it wishes from the wealth of private Americans.

I wonder how many of my liberal friends on WatchBlog will agree with this “Progressive” view.


Posted by: Royal Flush at August 6, 2013 4:57 PM
Comment #369243

http://lastresistance.com/2959/innovation-not-a-bleeding-heart-will-change-our-education-system/

“The state of Louisiana is already well known for its evolving approach to public education, but Governor Bobby Jindal is looking to make it even better. The city of New Orleans already has 80 percent of students in charter schools and the state has one of the most extensive voucher programs in the country. But Governor Jindal is looking to take it a step further by including the private sector in the education process.”

What Governor Jindal has done is put into place a system for evaluating teachers called COMPASS. According to Louisiana’s department of education website: “Compass is the state’s educator support and evaluation system. The system is designed to provide all teachers with regular, meaningful feedback on their performance and aligned supports to foster continuous improvement…Under the new system, every teacher and school leader in each public school is evaluated annually using a four-tiered rating – highly effective, effective: proficient, effective: emerging, and ineffective…For teachers, half of the evaluation is based on student learning and half of the evaluation is based on observations by principals or their trained designees using the state’s Compass teacher rubric.”

According to Nola: “StudentsFirst [education reform group] has named Louisiana #1 for ‘putting students first in its education policies,’ commending in particular the state’s new teacher evaluation system.”

Posted by: Royal Flush at August 6, 2013 5:05 PM
Comment #369249

You should teach them about biology. Sex is too complicated for people that age. You don’t want your high school age children having sex, do you? Don’t teach them about having sex, teach them about the biological function.

What have you against teaching children not to kill, or steal, or being untrustworthy? And how do you intend to teach these children not to kill, or steal, or not be untrustworthy if you don’t teach them morality? How do you teach morality if you don’t instill in them a sense of something larger than themselves? You can’t, Stephen Daugherty. It should be obvious it can’t be done by the way children are coming out of school these days.

Posted by: Weary Willie at August 6, 2013 6:05 PM
Comment #369250

Weary, you make some good points. Unfortunately, many liberals have their own definition of morality which differs from the Christian view. Theirs is the morality of doing what feels good.

Posted by: Royal Flush at August 6, 2013 6:18 PM
Comment #369251

We have proof that things can change. The proof, sadly, is displayed by the way liberals have changed our country. They have changed it for the worse.

Having said that, it is also proof it can be changed again for the better. We can use the same tactics liberals used. A constant, unrelenting, repeated, drumbeat of how we want it to be. We can embarrass those we disagree with. We can put people who disagree with us in a bad light. I know, they’ll cry like the babies they are, but I remember when they themselves called something like that “Tough Love”.

Posted by: Weary Willie at August 6, 2013 6:39 PM
Comment #369252

Weary, it is the obligation of conservatives to uphold the flame of liberty in this land. It is not always an easy job as human nature tends to greed and covetousness.

We don’t and won’t win every battle with the liberal/progressive philosophy, and we don’t have to as long as we win the war. The liberal chickens are coming home to roost in some of our largest cities and states which have been run into the ground by their failed leadership and ideas.

God-based morality will return to the land as more people discover the rottenness and misery of man-based immorality.

Posted by: Royal Flush at August 6, 2013 6:52 PM
Comment #369255

I’m afraid things are going to get real bad before a liberal eventually says, “Oh, God! Help Me!”
It’s going to happen, though. It’s inevitable. Like Lady Thatcher said, “…until they run out of other people’s money.”
It will be the people with strong moral character and conservative values that will weather the storm. When the going gets tough, the tough get going. Liberals will take to the streets in violent ways. It is the only way they know to get what they want. That has already been proven in many instances.

Posted by: Weary Willie at August 6, 2013 8:19 PM
Comment #369256

“You don’t want your high school age children having sex, do you?”

Where have you been the last 50 years, Willie? The horse has long left the barn on that issue.

I am not advocating sex for young teenagers but lets be realistic. Safe practices, birth control options and consequences of pregnancy should be taught. Yes, sex is “complicated.” Perhaps we should discuss some of the complications before these young people make unfortunate and uninformed choices.

Posted by: Rich at August 6, 2013 8:28 PM
Comment #369257

Rich, isn’t it interesting you mention “the last 50 years”? You’ve identified the problem, inadvertently I presume, with your comment. The last 50 years, the years liberal progressive ideology has influenced and dominated our culture and our government. Now that we’ve identified the problem, Liberal progressive ideology, let’s start fixing it.

The horse has long left the barn on that issue.

I’m not willing to just give in to the last 50 years simply because the last 50 years happened. I’m willing to make the next 50 years a return to the values and the morals that made this country great.

Government is in the habit of identifying a problem and then tinkering around the edges of that problem to say they’re trying to fix it. They don’t actually address the problem. They end up making more problems and then they tinker with those as well. I cannot understand why we would hide one simple rule, “Thou shall not steal” under a bushel and replace it with a myriad of man-made laws as a substitute. Once you limit a law to one specific instance you’ve made every other instance legal!

So, it’s time to nip the problem in the bud. Liberal Progressive Ideology. I’m all for teaching students it’s “We The People” not “I the person”.

Posted by: Weary Willie at August 6, 2013 9:24 PM
Comment #369258

Willie,

Did you forget about FDR, Harry Truman, JFK and the majority Democratic congress during the 30s through the 70s? If anything, the last fifty years have been a period of resurgent conservative philosophy beginning with Nixon/Ford, continuing with Reagan, Bush I and Bush II.

“I cannot understand why we would hide one simple rule, “Thou shall not steal” under a bushel and replace it with a myriad of man-made laws as a substitute.”

How about the Constitution of the United States?

Posted by: Rich at August 6, 2013 9:51 PM
Comment #369259

C&J-
The problem, as far as I’m concerned, is that there’s no ambition in the conservative movement beyond the mere correction of what FDR and other liberals did to the country. Under Democratic leadership, we undertook major projects to improve the nation’s infrastructure and economy, we did amazing things like explore the seas and send a manned mission to the moon.

Since then, it seems, as the conservative movement has risen, that more and more of what America is doing is coasting on its past glory, while repudiating the science funding, the trust in science, the safeguards of the economy, the assertive trade position, and all the other things that let America be great in the first place.

And your people in Congress, what are they doing?

Good question!

I look at these fellows, and it just seems that rather than look at a situation, and judge things with some kind of individual insight, they simply, blindly apply their axioms, not bothering to consider consequences beyond that.

Ellison? I think you’re not getting the central, inelegant point he was making. I’m not quite as big a fan of welfare state programs. I think it’s better to develop than to try and impose prosperity. But he’s right about something: There’s a big difference between the inability to pay our debts, which this country doesn’t have, and the unwillingness to pay, which the country does suffer from. Truth is, people want a lot of the programs. Their trouble is with what the other guy gets.

I think it’s worth remarking upon that even Tea Partiers rejected major changes to Medicare and Social Security. They see big government as a problem, but they don’t even register that their healthcare is among the most expensive things paid for.

Which is why I would say this: everybody’s interested in doing something for the common good. The problem is, not everybody interested in the same thing. But there are times when most people are. And I would say that’s something we should look out for. We need to realize that, at the end of the day, the American people are not strictly divided along party lines, and that there are many layers of intersections and cross sections of agreement. Unfortunately, one side has decided that no matter how much we share in terms of what we want or don’t want out of our government, they’re only going to focus on our deepest divisions, and carrying out a scorched Earth campaign of obstruction to keep the rest of us from getting things we want that they don’t agree with.

Posted by: Stephen Daugherty at August 6, 2013 11:01 PM
Comment #369260

Rich, the federal government has usurped much of it’s power. In no way has the US constitution granted the federal government the amount of power and control over the states and the individual it has today.

The Republican party of today is simply the other side of the government coin. Both the Democratic and the Republican parties of today are cut from the same cloth. The cloth that was woven with the thread of progressive ideology. This is why many cannot tell the difference between the two parties in Washington D.C.

Why do you think conservative politicians and their supporters are considered crackpots and loons by members of both parties? I don’t think they know what a real conservative is other than a threat to their control and power and position.

Posted by: Weary Willie at August 6, 2013 11:04 PM
Comment #369263

It is fascinating how the left views government spending and debt. They constantly rail at the conservatives in the house for being miserly about authorizing ever more spending by raising the debt limit.

Our founders were wise in giving control over the national purse-strings to house members who face election every two years. These elected members of the house are doing their constitutional duty by attempting to get our financial house under control.

Our founders could envision a day when government “credit card” spending would become unsustainable and only trusted the House as being responsible enough to the people to check those excesses.

They did not give this power to the senate or to the president or to the judiciary. And…aren’t we glad they didn’t?

Posted by: Royal Flush at August 7, 2013 9:53 AM
Comment #369265

Stephen

“I think it’s worth remarking upon that even Tea Partiers rejected major changes to Medicare and Social Security. They see big government as a problem, but they don’t even register that their healthcare is among the most expensive things paid for”

Those Tea Partiers were the seniors who had been forced to pay into Medicare and Social Security for most of their working lives. Liberal policy took away their ability to save for those two things and placed them into the position to demand a return on their forced “investment.”

You like to talk about how people on the right won’t compromise and give you everything you want, but where is the lefts willingness to compromise on these types of things?

Why is it that you demand total capitulation for what you deem to be for the “common good,” but dismiss other ideas as a “scorched Earth campaign of obstruction?”

Posted by: kctim at August 7, 2013 10:28 AM
Comment #369328

“Liberal policy took away their ability to save for those two things and placed them into the position to demand a return on their forced “investment.”

Are you kidding, kctim? SS and Medicare have not been called the third rail of politics for no reason. Both programs have received overwhelming public support since their inceptions. Do you really think “Tea Party” types would have supported repeal of SS and/or Medicare during their working years? If so, they had every opportunity to do so. They did not.

Posted by: Rich at August 8, 2013 7:48 PM
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