The South Will Rise Again

Self styled sophisticates disparage the South. Even natives of Brooklyn & Boston feel qualified to ridicule southern speech. Yet much of what they believe about the South is based on TV shows and old stereotypes that are no longer true, if they ever were. “The Economist” featured a survey of the South and if you have five-and-a-half minutes you can hear what a fresh outside observer says.

Since many will not bother to listen to the podcast and fewer still will read the survey, especially the premium content, let me note a couple of things I thought were salient.

The British author, Robert Guest has seen enough of the world to tell us that no part of the United States is poor by world standards, but the South is still relatively poorer than the rest of the United States. Much of the relative poverty is history. It started with slavery. It made some individuals rich, but slavery is inefficient and it kept the South poor and backward. The Civil War resulted in the loss of 2/3 of the South’s accumulated wealth and then the legacy of racism perpetuated many of the troubles. Things have changed. Racism is still as issue, as it is all over, but a Pew survey recently found that 31% of Southern blacks while only 20% of blacks outside the South say discrimination is rare.

People are moving south. The South’s share of the U.S. population has risen from about a quarter in 1960 to about a third today. One prosaic but crucial reason is the spread of air conditioning. Another is that the South is a great place to work and live. Cost of living is significantly lower and the pace is often more agreeable.

The biggest challenge to the South remains education. The South has many high tech research clusters, but it must import much of the talent to support them. The region has some excellent schools and great universities. The Universities of Virginia & North Carolina are among the top public universities in the country. Duke, Rice, Vanderbilt & Emory can hold their own, but the South still lacks the overall culture of education you might find in New England or the upper Midwest, but there are reasons for optimism.

Since I am now in my anecdotage, I have to tell my first story of the South. Those of you uninterested in anecdotes can skip this.

Although I live in Virginia, I was born in Wisconsin and pretty much never went anywhere as a kid. My freshman year in college, I decided it was too cold in Wisconsin and I thought I would hitchhike to warmer weather in Florida during spring break, so I packed a little food and set out. I was too cheap to buy a map, but I memorized one at the library. Unfortunately, memory is feeble. After two days I ended up lost in south Alabama. I had eaten all my food and had only $10 when I realized my plan was flawed, but not before my southern ghost encounter. I was talking to these guys at a gas station near Opp, Alabama. They told me stories about snakes in the tall grass. These were not ordinary snakes like we had in Wisconsin, they said. I became convinced that if I slept out in the tall grass, the snakes would crawl in and bite me. That evening I was walking down a local road looking for a place to sleep. It was very dark. There was nothing but tall grass - and potentially snakes - on both sides of the road, until finally I saw some short grass. I figured it was a roadside pullover and stretched out. No snakes. When it got light the next morning, I found I was in a graveyard. Had I known it was a graveyard, I doubt I would have slept peacefully. As it was, it was a very peaceful night. Even the ghosts in the South are polite.

Posted by Jack at March 11, 2007 10:26 PM
Comments
Comment #211514

Jack,

So what you’re saying is that the South isn’t any different than anywhere else in America.

Why is it then that for elementary schools, of instance, six of the bottom twelve states are in the South?
This is for 2003,

http://www.psk12.com/rating/USthreeRsphp/STATE_US_level_Elementary_CountyID_0.html

The interview said nothing new.
The poor in America are better off than anywhere else?
Yep.
The problems for education are in the poorer areas?
Yep.

And so on.

Jack, I expect better from you.

Perhaps you’re just having a down day.

Posted by: Rocky at March 11, 2007 11:11 PM
Comment #211516

Rocky

I just thought it was an interesting survey and podcast. It is good to see our country in a different perspective.

BTW - the Economist podcasts are free and they are very good. I download them every week.

Posted by: Jack at March 11, 2007 11:20 PM
Comment #211518

As far as quality of school rankings go, that tracks more closely with ethnic diversity than it does with how far north or how far south a place lies.

Yes, Vermont tends to have good public schools. But that has more to do with the monochromatic nature of the population of Vermont than its proximity to the Canadian border. Now look at California. In the bottom five but hardly a place you’d associate with the values or culture of the South.

Don’t get me wrong: I’m not saying that whites are smarter. Just that its a whole lot easier to educate large groups of people when they have the same culture and language.

As far as culture goes, most of our most prominent founding fathers with Southern, and some of the greatest and most distinctive achievements of American culture have their roots in the South. Jazz, William Faulkner, Mark Twain, etc. Also, for the record, plenty of Southerners mock and ridicule Yankees too (and I don’t just mean the baseball team).

Posted by: Loyal Opposition at March 12, 2007 12:40 AM
Comment #211519

The South is improving. It is the dilution effect. A large number of folks from the North have been moving to the South. Huge dilution effect on attitudes and values. Then there is the politically correct effect resulting from laws and culture change that cost “rednecks” (of any ethnicity), money, family, and jobs if they don’t comply and hide their prejudices and ignorance. Huge effect.

And finally the greatest dilution effect of all. The old timers are dying off making way for attitudes and values born of more modern times.

The South still has many attitude, education, and value adjustment problems, but they are less starkly contrasting from the rest of the country, these days. There are amenities which I have always liked about the South, that are superior to those in many Northern cities. But they have always been cosmetic amenities until the changes of the last two decades which see the South joining the rest of the nation.

Posted by: David R. Remer at March 12, 2007 12:48 AM
Comment #211522

I think it is more than dilution. I think the media and arts have had an influence, as well as, (shudder) public education.

The younger generations have different outlooks than their parents. Racism is losing out because it is stupid.

Posted by: gergle at March 12, 2007 12:58 AM
Comment #211531
Even natives of Brooklyn & Boston feel qualified to ridicule southern speech.

And vice versa, apparently.

Actually, ever since 2000 we’ve been bombarded with arguments that people in the South and central Plains states are the only real Americans. We (I live in Dixie) are apparently culturally and morally superior to those Yankees who believe in things like cappucino, drive-thru abortions, and gay marriage. Only people who live in Red States are salt-of-the-earth ‘Mericans. (New Yorkers get a pass too because they elected Giuliani.)

This is of course preposterous. New England was the cradle of the American revolution.

One of things that made me happiest about the 2006 election was that the media would let go of its heavily Red-hued notions about real Americans. Time will tell.

Posted by: Woody Mena at March 12, 2007 9:19 AM
Comment #211535

YAWN…..

Posted by: Rachel at March 12, 2007 9:59 AM
Comment #211561
Self styled sophisticates disparage the South. Even natives of Brooklyn & Boston feel qualified to ridicule southern speech.
So the article starts out with a broad brush insult impugning “urban northeast liberals” with differing opinions about topics yet unstated as being egotistical and self righteous. I believe it was Freud who said “We hate the most in others that which we hate most in our selves”
Yet much of what they believe about the South is based on TV shows and old stereotypes that are no longer true, if they ever were.
Yeah, the Klan and lynchings and slavery never really existed. And to top it off, we are too stupid to tell the difference between reality and reruns of “heat of the night”
Duke, Rice, Vanderbilt & Emory can hold their own,
Let me add my own “anecdote”… A friend of ours, a genetics professor at a local university, almost turned down a senior position at Vanderbilt becuase they had a difficult time finding a school district that taught evolution. The Principal of the only one that did teach it cautioned her that he “might not be able to continue doing so with all the pressure on him to stop”. Perhaps things aren’t quite as “improved” as some would want us to believe after all. Posted by: Dave1-20-2009 at March 12, 2007 1:35 PM
Comment #211562

Well, I’m a sophisticate, self-styled and I disparage anyone whose world view is shaped by symbolism, stereotype and slogan. The Republican Party has attained power, barely, in recent years because of their ability to manipulate prejudice through use of these three mechanisms. Couching notions of racism within the slogan of “States Rights”; justifying ignorance through creating the myth that liberals are over-educated “sophisticates”, taking advantage of what reasonable, legitimate patriotism people have by labeling any criticism of this administration’s foreign policy as being “an attack on the troops”.
Republican Conservatives have much to be ashamed about regarding their naked attempts to manipulate the electorate.
Voters, including those in states that gave their national electors to w should be throughly embarrassed that they could be so easily used.

Posted by: Charles Ross at March 12, 2007 1:36 PM
Comment #211566

I just read “clay barham’s” insightful paragraph on the arrogance of the “political elite”.
I can’t think of a better expression of what I’m trying to say in my post just above. It gives stupid people everywhere a two-way chance to feel better about themselves:
that being sophisticated is a bad thing and
that they are the ones who are part of this third, independent, self-sufficient group (even if they are, in liberal-world reality, not).

Posted by: Charles Ross at March 12, 2007 1:54 PM
Comment #211591

Woody

I was born in Wisconsin, educated in Minnesota. I have lived in those places, plus Indiana, Washington State, New Hampshire, Maryland, California & Virginia, plus several places overseas. I have liked everywhere I have lived and found the people charming in their own ways. As a native Yankee who now has significant exposure to the south, I can say that I do not think they get a fair shake. When we lived in New Hampshire, some of the teachers thought my kids must be a little dumb because they had gone to school in Virginia. The Fairfax, Va school system where they went is among the best in the U.S., BTW.

The South is a vast area that includes 1/3 of the U.S. population. Lots of things you can say about it are true.

Dave

I said nothing about NE liberals. I simply have noted that accents in Boston and Brooklyn are hardly more beautiful than those of the south. My accent, BTW, is upper Midwest and that is the one I can understand the easiest, but I sure prefer a southern accent to one for NJ.

Charles

I am not sure why you think the south is stupid. Is it because they want to vote more Republican than Dem or that they are tricked into doing so by clever (presumably carpetbagging) Republicans?

Did you listen to or read the “Economist” survey? You will find some things are not as you think anymore.

Posted by: Jack at March 12, 2007 3:28 PM
Comment #211596

Charles Ross,

“Voters, including those in states that gave their national electors to w should be throughly embarrassed that they could be so easily used.”

We weren’t used by anyone…including the Republican Party.

We (The South) were “written off” by John Kerry and the Dem leadership…as were the other “red” states that weren’t on the short list of “winnable” states (the states that would give Kerry a majority in the Electoral College). No attempt was made to even “pander” to us.

I guess we in the South were written off because Kerry just didn’t need our votes.

Posted by: Jim T at March 12, 2007 3:49 PM
Comment #211598
Dave, I said nothing about NE liberals. I simply have noted that accents in Boston and Brooklyn are hardly more beautiful than those of the south.
Then what does
Self styled sophisticates disparage the South. Even natives of…
mean? Am I supposed to believe there was no connection intended? No history of Republic rhetoric? Please… Posted by: Dave1-20-2009 at March 12, 2007 3:53 PM
Comment #211606
People are moving south.

…And bringing their liberal notions with them. Most of my family did just that recently. Gawd those Southerners hate it.

Posted by: American Pundit at March 12, 2007 4:24 PM
Comment #211617

Dave

You can believe what you want. Have you recently listened to a Brooklyn accent?

AP

It depends on what you mean by liberal. The defintion has been kinda fluid lately. If you mean bigger and more intrustive government, I bet they do hate it.

As for party identification, the south was solid Dem at the time when Vermont and New Hampshire were rock ribbed Republican. The greatest generation of my wife’s Wisconsin farm relatives still think Democrat is a perjorative term. Things change.

Maybe it is an inconvenient truth, but you know that your front runners are at least part southern. You got the personal injury lawyer from the Carolinas, the wife of the governor of Arkansas, & the former Senator for Tennessee.

On the other hand, the Republican leader is the former mayor or NYC and the two other front runners are the Senator from Arizona and the former governor of Mass. Maybe this geo thing doesn’t work so well.

Posted by: Jack at March 12, 2007 5:20 PM
Comment #211625

Now for a true Southerner to put his 1 cent worth in. See, even opinions cost less down here. :)
I was born in 1946 in South Georgia. That means I grew up during the 1950s and early 1960s.
Our educational system then wasn’t the best in the state much less than in the rest of the country. But while I was being given a sub standard education compared to the rest of the country, we had some around here that were pretty much just baby sat for 6 hours a day with out being taught much if anything at all. And the only reason they were in school was the law required it. That was because they were Black and “Naw N——- needs to knaw nottin except how to be a pullin cottin”.
Today the educational system is still failing the students. Only now it’s failing students of every race equally. This is mostly because standards have been lowered. A student can pass with just a 65 instead of the 80 it took when I was a kid.
Black folks couldn’t look White folks in the face much less in the eye when I was growing up without risking being beaten on the spot. I’ve seen it happen. And a Black man sure didn’t dare talk directly to a White woman. Much less even let it be known that he found her attractive.
Today Blacks and Whites marry and except for the few idiots that give us Southerners a bad name no one really pays it much mind.
While my brother-in-law was legally able to marry my sister when they married in 1974, he requested that the Air Force not station him in the South until around 1982 because folks didn’t take truck by a ‘Black Buck’ marrying a White girl. The preacher at the church we grew up in and that knew us all our lives refused to preform the wedding, and the preacher at the church my brother-in-law grew up in refused to do it too. They had to go to a JP who was bound by law to marry them.
In 1996 Daughter # 3 and one of my Black employees at the factory fell in love with each other. Most our friends where genuinely happy for them. The preacher at our church had no problem with preforming the wedding and the preacher at my son-in-law’s church came over and helped out. No one in either church objected to any of this. In fact we had just as many Blacks at the wedding as we did Whites.
When I was a kid Blacks were lucky to get $1 a day for busting their butts in the feild all day while Whites got $4 to $5 a day and didn’t work as hard. In fact even the Blacks that worked in town only got $1 a day while their White counterparts got $5 to $7 a day for the same job. The reason? “No N——- needs moe thin no $1 a day. Give em moe thin thet and they’lla git all uppity and all”.
Today Blacks and Whites get the same pay for the same work. And I don’t see anymore ‘uppity’ Blacks than Whites.
Things have improved drastically over the last few decades. But there is still a lot of room for improvement. Economically, educationally and racially. Just like in the rest of the country.

Posted by: Ron Brown at March 12, 2007 6:24 PM
Comment #211626

I have yet to meet the Republican or Democrat who is willing to say that if a brute negligently and with abandon injures them causing their family hardship, they would NOT seek a personal injury attorney to represent them in trying relieve the hardship on their family.

Like human beings, personal injury attorneys come in both kinds, good ones, and bad. But, the innuendo that is thrown about at personal injury attorneys is like brandishing all Catholic Priests as pedophiles because a minority in their fold actually are.

Such innuendo is a symbol for an irrational mind unwilling to accept and deal with reality if their is something to be gained by refuting reality.

Posted by: David R. Remer at March 12, 2007 6:31 PM
Comment #211631

David

You guys sure are touchy.

I mention an unattractive Brooklyn accent & Dave things NE liberal. I mention one of your leading candidate is a personal injury lawyer from the Carolinas, and suddenly we are in full lawyer defense mode.

Is there something I do not know that you guys are ashamed about. Thou doth protest too much, methinks.

Posted by: Jack at March 12, 2007 6:53 PM
Comment #211633

Jack:
“I simply have noted that accents in Boston and Brooklyn are hardly more beautiful than those of the south.”

In my view (and I’ve moved all over the country as well), a person’s accent has quite a lot to do with how and who raised them, and how well educated they are.

“My accent, BTW, is upper Midwest and that is the one I can understand the easiest, but I sure prefer a southern accent to one for NJ.”

It may be fun to stereotype Jack, but the truth is not everyone from NJ calls it New Joisey.

Posted by: Adrienne at March 12, 2007 7:13 PM
Comment #211635

Well Jack,you are right about Wisconson being too cold antway.

Posted by: BillS at March 12, 2007 7:14 PM
Comment #211638

Dave1-20-2009
Get off it. I’m 60 and evolution has been taught in schools in the South all my life. It just been taught as the theory it is and not gospel truth like y’all Yankees want it to be.

AP

People are moving south.
…And bringing their liberal notions with them. Most of my family did just that recently. Gawd those Southerners hate it.

We don’t hate the folks moving South as such. It’s the idiots that come down here (about 40% of all those that come here)and think we’re all stupid just because we were born and raised down here. And they’re so much smarter and better. They’re all ways talk about how much better things are and smarter everyone is up North than down here. Well if it is then why the H—- are they coming down here? If they think it’s so much better up North then they need to carry their butts back up their. No one here will miss them. We have enough idiots of our own to deal with. We don’t want the ones from up North or anywhere else.

Happiness: A car load of Yankees heading North pulling travel trailer loaded with Yankees. ha :)

Thank God of spell check. I write the way I talk and that means that I spell words the way I pronounce them. Y’all up there in New England would have a clue as to what I’m saying.
Mah caat whent up tha tharee and AH hadda go up thar n git har.

Posted by: Ron Brown at March 12, 2007 7:25 PM
Comment #211646
I’m 60 and evolution has been taught in schools in the South all my life. It just been taught as the theory it is and not gospel truth like y’all Yankees want it to be.

I’m not sure that your first statement is correct. As for your second one, well you’re right, the theory of evolution is not “gospel truth”. It is the kind of thing you are supposed to believe on the basis of evidence, not from the word of authority figures who claim to be in communication with God.

Posted by: Woody Mena at March 12, 2007 9:46 PM
Comment #211648

Adrienne

You should not bother me about my preference for accents, while letting so many extremely ignorant stereotypes of the south pass unnoticed. Maybe you cannot detect regional accents, but the natives of an area usually have certain characteristic speech patterns and it adds to the fun of travel. I love the Virginia accents. I can identify at least four of them. Unfortunately, it is usually the older guys who have the best examples and the younger generations of Virginians, and Americans, is homogenizing.

Unlike the PC crowd, I enjoy true diversity.

Posted by: Jack at March 12, 2007 9:52 PM
Comment #211651

You can believe what you want…by Jack

I can only imagine three reasons why you placed those first two sentences together (in descending probability):
a) Belief that people wouldn’t “notice”
b) No recognition, trapped in own rhetoric
c) Poor literary skills

As for the “evolution is a theory” y’all… You proved my point exactly.

Posted by: Dave1-20-2009 at March 12, 2007 10:19 PM
Comment #211653

Jack:
“You should not bother me about my preference for accents, while letting so many extremely ignorant stereotypes of the south pass unnoticed.”

Unnoticed? Jack, I’ve lived in the South. I met many people there who could be called stereotypes, and I met many who weren’t stereotypes in any way, shape or form — just like every other place I’ve ever lived in this country.

“Maybe you cannot detect regional accents”

No, I can detect them. Their severity seems to hinge on all of those factors I mentioned earlier.

“Unlike the PC crowd,”

I don’t know what this means. I do know however, that Ann KKKoulter (and others like her) have been using this “PC crowd” label to differentiate as well as excuse herself for acting like an angry, hateful, rude, offensive, and ill mannered hag-in-a-cocktail-dress.

“I enjoy true diversity.”

Yes, me too. Perhaps that’s why I ended up living in one of the most diverse places in the entire country.

Posted by: Adrienne at March 12, 2007 10:30 PM
Comment #211655

Woody
My statement is correct. We studied evolution every year from 7th grade until graduation. My daddy studied it in 1927 when he was in the 7th grade.
And I’m not supposed to believe in anything unless I choose too. And there aint no evidence proving evolution. That’s exactly why it only a theory.

Dave1
I don’t see how I proved anything. Just because you choose to believe that evolution is gospel truth and want to believe the so called scientist that say it is doesn’t make it so.
Again that’s exactly why it’s only a theory.


While I like the Southern accent I go bonkers over the Austrailian accent. Maybe that’s why I fell so hard for my wife.

Posted by: Ron Brown at March 12, 2007 10:41 PM
Comment #211659

Dave

Are you actually sterotyping me as not believing in evolution? Evolution is a theory. I understand what a theory is. And evolution is the best explanation of our current world. I think this whole evolution argument is a crock. Most people do not understand that nature of scientific theories and I expect that most people on both sides of the debate think man evolved from monkeys and they are fighting about the wrong things.

If you know anything about my writing, BTW, you know that I expect everything will be noticed. It might be poor literary skills, but then I expect you would not come back so often to get more.

You should take it at face value. A Brooklyn accent is unpleasant. It is funny if someone with such an accent makes fun of a southerner.


Adrienne

Re diversity, I have found that many people are interested in mixing and matching colors, but feel uncomfortable when people have different ideas.

If you understand accents why the foolishness about stereotypes?

Posted by: Jack at March 12, 2007 10:59 PM
Comment #211661

Adrienne,

Your note on regional accents and the correlation to education is unfortunately probably truer today than it has been in the past for the South, but it is still nowhere near a foregone conclusion. One generation ago, most Ph.D’s raised in the South spoke with a Southern accent. While word choice and grammar were much different for someone with a Ph.D. than someone with less than a high school education, the accents were not.

I was raised in a family with Southern Heritage going back over 100 years. All of my grandparents went to college (between 1910 and 1930). My parents, grandparents, and aunts and uncles all speak with a Southern accent. Three Vanderbilt diplomas, two M.D.’s, two R.N.’s, and a Phi Beta Kappa key from the valedictorian of North Carolina State class of 1913 did not put a dent in the accents of their offspring. The only thing that did it was leaving the South. My sister and I both left the South and lost our accents. But they come back when we go home.

The story of my family is not unique in this regard.

Your point is one more of the generalizations about that South based on trying to extrapolate what happens to microregional accents in the North East that leads to the misconception that a Southern accent is a sign of lack of education (or worse yet, intellegence).

Posted by: Rob at March 12, 2007 11:09 PM
Comment #211667

Jack:
“Re diversity, I have found that many people are interesting in mixing and matching colors, but feel uncomfortable when people have different ideas.”

That’s pretty sad. How horrible that must feel to be uncomfortable with so many people. And how incredibly boring it would be to always surround yourself with those who think exactly like you.

“If you understand accents why the foolishness about stereotypes?”

Because stereotypes often contain a wee kernel of (sometimes wonderful, sometimes embarrassing) truth.

Rob:
“Your point is one more of the generalizations about that South based on trying to extrapolate what happens to microregional accents in the North East that leads to the misconception that a Southern accent is a sign of lack of education (or worse yet, intellegence).”

Rob, that’s totally preposterous! I wasn’t making a generalization about everyone who has a Southern accent showing a lack of education or intelligence! I think you’re being a little too sensitive about what I think seems pretty obvious.
Look, if most of us blogging here didn’t manage to get a half way decent education, and have our families, teachers and friends correcting us on our grammar, pronunciation and word usage, we’d no doubt all sound like a bunch of dummies — no matter what part of the country hail from! :^)

Posted by: Adrienne at March 13, 2007 12:06 AM
Comment #211669

Jack, while you are entitled to your opinion I disagree with your assertion that accents from New York, Boston and other parts of the northeast, I think they’re beautiful. I know that when I sometimes meet someone without knowledge of the local accent here I sometimes poke a little fun if they mispronounce the names of places such as cities like Worcester (It’s pronounced Wusstah, not War-chester), Gloucester (Glousstah) and my favorite, Leominster, (I could not help giggling when a caller from their called C-Span’s Washington Journal and the host said Leo-minister instead of Lemon-stah). And don’t even let me get started about the subway stations in Boston, the easiest way to tell if someone is a tourist is when they ask which line goes to Cope-ly station instead of Caahply station.

Ron, I am also thankful for spell check to translate my words so they may be understood by others; otherwise I’d be typing prahduce instead of produce.

No one should judge anyone else because of their accent, while the stereotype that southern accents reflect upon a lack of education may at one time been true due to the South’s history of having underperformed in areas like education. It seems that trend is reversing. But it is still true that if one seeks a career in a high tech field one will probably have to live in California or Boston because it is there that most research labs and whatnot are located. My father even moved from New York City to Boston after he was done with college because he could not find adequate employment as a physicist there. I hope that in the future things will equalize geographically and allow the nation to move forward, but I think it may require more widespread of Liberalism. For I attribute the success of the Northeast and California economically mainly to these regions adoption of liberal policies that allowed for greater development and industrialization early on and have consequently created this imbalance.

Posted by: Warren P at March 13, 2007 12:36 AM
Comment #211670

Ron, one more thing, I think you father was very fortunate to have learned about evolution in 1927 merely two years after in Tennessee a teacher was arrested and fined for teaching the best accepted scientific explanation of the origin of life. The law that was used to prosecute him remained on the books it Tennessee until 1967.

Posted by: Warren P at March 13, 2007 12:40 AM
Comment #211684

Warren

I suppose taste in accents is like taste in music. You are right that New England accents are also interesting because of the local history. I recall the funny looks I got when I first pronouned peabody and halverhill.

The fun aspect about both NE and Southern accents is that they follow an oral tradition, i.e. people brought the roots with them from the British isles and they developed as spoken language. In the Midwest immigrants from non-English speaking countries dominated. They learned English by the book, so accents are more homogeneous and they tell less about the person’s origins.

Posted by: Jack at March 13, 2007 9:00 AM
Comment #211701
And there aint no evidence proving evolution. That’s exactly why it only a theory.

Trying hard not to attack the messenger here… Either your science teacher didn’t do a very good job of explaining the relevant concepts, or you were looking at girls and not paying attention.

Posted by: Woody Mena at March 13, 2007 10:44 AM
Comment #211707

Woody
Why should I have paid attention. Barbie Stephens was a whole heap cuter than anyone else in the room. Specially Mr Carpenter. And she sat right next to me. ha :)
I’m not gonna change your mind and your not gonna change mine. But then I’m not trying to change your mind.

Warren
Guess what? We like to poke a little fun at the way folks from other parts of the country pronounce the names some of our place here in GA.
Roswell - Roswall not Rosewell
Cordele - Cawdell not Coredale or Coredell
Coweta - Cieata not Co wetta
Louisville - Louisvall - not Louieville
But then I’m guilty of this myself. In the Bay Area of California there’s a town named San Jose (San Hoza). The first time I saw it I called it San Josey.


Posted by: Ron Brown at March 13, 2007 11:56 AM
Comment #211708

My wife’s gonna kill me if she sees that.

Posted by: Ron Brown at March 13, 2007 11:57 AM
Comment #211731

Jack,

So you’re saying (b)?

BTW;
1) the evolution comment was directed to Ron (I don’t know where the ‘Ron’ salutation went)

2) I don’t consider limited regional affectations of vernacular or pronounciation to be germaine here.

3) For those who don’t know, men are not decended from monkeys, monkeys and man share a common ancestry.

Posted by: Dave1-20-2009 at March 13, 2007 2:02 PM
Comment #211739

Just for the heck of it, here are some regionalisms I’ve encountered:

Marietta GA (May retta)
Manchaca TX (Man shack)
Lake Buchanon TX (Buck hannon)
I thought Boerne was “born” – it’s Bernie
Maryville TN (Mer a ville)
And Louisville TN isn’t Loo ee ville, it’s well Lewisville.

In Ohio, we go “by” people’s homes. Don’t know why we just go by and don’t stop in to visit. :-}

I think all the differences make life way more interesting and fun and are an integral part of what makes our country what it is.

Posted by: jackie at March 13, 2007 2:27 PM
Comment #211742

ok, let’s repair that

In Ohio, we go “by” people’s homes. Don’t know why we just go by and don’t stop in to visit.

Boerne isn’t born, it’s Bernie

And Louisville, TN is actually Lewisville, not Looeyville. Sorry about the errors.

Posted by: jackie at March 13, 2007 2:32 PM
Comment #211741

ok, let’s repair that

In Ohio, we go “by” people’s homes. Don’t know why we just go by and don’t stop in to visit.

Boerne isn’t born, it’s Bernie

And Louisville, TN is actually Lewisville, not Looeyville. Sorry about the errors.

Posted by: jackie at March 13, 2007 2:32 PM
Comment #211753

Marietta GA (May retta)

Forgot that one jackie. Thanks. I’ve heard it pronouned Mary etta.

Posted by: Ron Brown at March 13, 2007 3:06 PM
Comment #211778

“Forgot that one jackie. Thanks. I’ve heard it pronouned Mary etta.”

Only south of the big chicken.

Posted by: tomd at March 13, 2007 5:18 PM
Comment #211786

That chicken is about as old as I am. Maybe older.
I remember going past it as a kid when visiting an uncle up there.

Posted by: Ron Brown at March 13, 2007 6:42 PM
Comment #211787

Off topic, but there is quite a bit of history behind the big chicken. It started life as a plain flat roofed Miss Georgia Daries outlet. Later became a hot dog stand called The Dawg House and later bought by KFC who put the chicken on it.

Posted by: tomd at March 13, 2007 6:52 PM
Comment #211846

Don’t even get me started on saguaro.

Posted by: Rocky at March 13, 2007 10:55 PM
Comment #211893

yall will have to pardon my intrusion on the conversation thus far… i did not read the contents of this blog in its entirety, but from what i have read…

what the hell…?

stop doggin the south unless you’re prepared to defend your own honor. i know i am.

look at the current oppressive, unitary federal government… bush sure as hellfire wasn’t born in the south, and neither was dickhead, nor even dumsfeld, to the best of my recollection. more and more, i think we southerners had the right idea from the get-go…

perhaps the south shall indeed rise again.

Posted by: Diogenes at March 14, 2007 4:34 AM
Comment #212010
i think we southerners had the right idea from the get-go…

Which idea are you refering to? To secede or own people? … just curious.

Posted by: jrb at March 14, 2007 6:51 PM
Comment #212034

jrb
Given that only about 1% owned slaves and less than maybe 4% believed in slavery. I would say that Diogenes was referring to succeeding.

Posted by: Ron Brown at March 14, 2007 10:06 PM
Comment #212072

Ron,

‘4% believed in slavery?’ That’s why you started the Civil War, 4%?

Also, please clarify re: secede vs. succeed

Posted by: Dave1-20-2009 at March 15, 2007 11:22 AM
Comment #212942

Dave1
Sorry to burst your bubble but y’all started the war by invading us.
OK, I used the wrong word.

Posted by: Ron Brown at March 20, 2007 10:23 PM
Comment #212946

Wow, you people are even revising history of the Civil War ?!?! Two words: Fort Sumter. Two more: You lost.

BTW: On 12 April 1861 my ancestors were still in Europe. Were yours slave owners? Did they fight for slavery or the Constitution?

Posted by: Dave1-20-2009 at March 20, 2007 11:57 PM
Comment #251384

People are constantly mocking the accents of both southern blacks and whites. My family originated from the south and I am tired of people mocking our Christian values. As whites learn to understand the damage that racism and bigotry caused and blacks learn to forgive us we will heal together. America had two sons; one white and one black. Both sons fought in every major war and helped builsd this great nation. One son was exalted for his accomplishments and for that of his brother that he stole. The other was beaten and forced to build his brother for free. After this period he was out of his bondage but was still beaten for the next 100 years. He was locked out of almost every major job market except service industries. All his ideas were stolen while his brother got all the credit. And we wonder why in every major city there are angry blacks killing each other. It is not a black issue but a human issue. You cannot continously pick on someone without them rising up and fighting back. Generational anger stems from the problems in sherman’s march and the poor handling of reconstruction. You can fight a war but if you burn a whole region’s land thereby taking his liveliehood and worth without pissing off that region. Keep in mind Sherman was the same man who when homeless former slave followed him he evantulally left them all onthe other side of a bridge he burned> Those people trusted him and he let them all drown or get shot by cofederate troops. After the war the president after Lincoln gave up on reconstruction midway through thereby doing the same thing Sherman did. He left them to the angry minority of asshole people who cared not for the poor confederate farmers who fought but only for their own power. People unchecked whether white or black will revert back to their sin nature. Had the president had the balls to finish reconsrtuction we would have blacks and white living together affirming one another instead of always jockying for position. God put blacks and whites together as brother but we still never validate each other. Blacks admire principled southern whites for our eagerness to lay it all on hte line. We admire them for their gift of fire and passion. Example; not to get too personal as some things are better left unsayed but although I don’t have the gift of many black men in their endowment( which God used to keep their manhood intact in a time when they had no manhood or self respect) I have other talents I excell at that most black women love such as a gifted tongue and strong country love and foreplay that lasts for hours and hours.(although as a recent practicing christian I remain celibate until I find a new wife). As soon as we stop being jelous of each other we will come together with the proper southern christian values. The south rose twice, once with the civil war and once with Dr. King. When we acknowldege that, forgive each other and unite the south will rise throughout the entire nation bringing with it love, unity and revival. We want our Christian nation back and want abortion(genocide) abolished. We want our children to have the freedom to pray in school if they so choose(freeedom of speach). We want at least the option to teach intelligent design. We want our children to be able to freely cary their bibles if they so choose to school rather than reading about a homosexual agenda which goes against everything in our conscience. We want the government to stop throwing God out of everything that is deemed public. Our military chaplains cannot even say the name Jesus in prayer . BULLCRAP. We want the government to stay out of our freedom of worship. Seperation of church and state was design to keep the government out of worship not vice versa. We did not want England to dictate that to us. THIS IS A CHRISTIAN NATION. We may have been a racist christian nation but the morals were intact. It is time for us to validate each other and for the body of Christ to take it’s place in the world. There comes a time when Christian men, black white, asian and hispanic must seperate ourselves from this world and set the example with our actions and integrity and fight for our chrisian freedoms TOGETHER and draw people to us by our unity and strength.

Posted by: Michael at April 25, 2008 2:11 AM
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