republican extermination

Trent Lott, eat your heart out.

Republicans don’t believe in the imagination, partly because so few of them have one, but mostly because it gets in the way of their chosen work, which is to destroy the human race and the planet. Human beings, who have imaginations, can see a recipe for disaster in the making; Republicans, whose goal in life is to profit from disaster and who don’t give a hoot about human beings, either can’t or won’t. Which is why I personally think they should be exterminated before they cause any more harm. -villagevoice.com

Strange, isn't it. The double standard. How small, independent, progressive, and liberal-minded, literary sources can advocate exterminating an entire class of people and no one blinks an eye?

Should the Village voice print an apology?

...George W. Bush, idiot scion of a genetically criminal family that should have been sterilized three generations ago. The hero of Foreman's new play, who is and is not the president of the United States, is a cowboy who dreams of being king of the universe. Only, in the first instance, he isn't really a cowboy—he's "a foppish English gentleman" named Rufus who dreams of being a "real American cowboy"; his dreams of being King Cowboy of the Universe are always being brought up short, during the work's giddy 80 minutes, by his awareness of this inherent falsity in his role. Waving and wildly discharging his giant six-shooter, Rufus invades the audience, drives his supporting cast off the stage, and revels in absolute power. But, as is customary in Foreman's deceitful universe, something always arrives to trip him up; often enough, it's his own self-doubt. Jay Smith, a strapping actor, plays these moments, when Rufus is suddenly overtaken by his fop actuality, with a hilarious dainty fastidiousness; it's like watching Tom Mix suddenly acquire a consciousness of Proust.

I'm not sure which is more ludicrous, the fact that this 'review' could get printed at all, or the fact that such a play would be worthy of reviewing.


Posted by Eric Simonson at June 9, 2004 1:13 AM